General Election

Telegraph
Theresa May is facing a mounting backlash over her “catastrophic” election campaign after her snap election gamble failed to pay off and Britain was left with a hung parliament this morning.  The Conservatives have emerged as the largest party but without an overall majority after losing  26 seats to the Labour Party and five to the Liberal Democrats. Britain has a hung parliament  after Labour’s victory in Southampton Test made it impossible for any party to reach the 326 MPs required to achieve an absolute  majority in the House of Commons. 

BBC News
The UK looks set to have a hung parliament with the Conservatives as the largest party, with most general election results now in. It means Theresa May faces the humiliation of ending with fewer seats than when she called the election. The Tories are projected to get 318 seats, Labour 261 and the SNP 35. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn called on Mrs May to resign – but she said the country needed stability and her party would “ensure” it was maintained. Labour looks set to make 29 gains with the Tories losing 13 seats – and the SNP down by 22 seats in a bad night for Nicola Sturgeon, with her party losing seats to the Tories, Labour and Lib Dems.

Mirror
Theresa May has suffered humiliation at the ballot box after her massive election gamble backfired, leaving Britain with a hung parliament. The Tories fell short of an overall majority in the House of Commons after the Labour Party gained dozens of seats. There are now question marks over the Brexit negotiations due to begin in just over a week and Mrs May’s future now hangs in the balance. Government ministers Ben Gummer, Jane Ellison, Simon Kirby and Gavin Barwell were among the Tories axed by voters, while Home Secretary Amber Rudd held on to her seat by just a few hundred votes. Elsewhere Nick Clegg and former SNP leader Alex Salmond both lost their seats.

Brexit

Express
BRUSSELS officials have revealed that the proposed start date for the Brexit talks has not yet been formally agreed with Britain, raising the prospect that a hung parliament could delay negotiations. Eurocrats are facing the nightmare prospect of the torturous divorce proceedings being dragged out even further if no single party wins a majority in tonight’s contest, as predicted by the exit poll. Contrary to claims made by Theresa May and some senior Conservatives, officials within the EU Commission have no preference over whether it Theresa May or Jeremy Corbyn becomes the next Prime Minister. However, they do hope to see whoever is triumphant emerge with a sizeable majority and a solid mandate, because a “strong leader” will be better placed to negotiate on behalf of Britain. 

Sun
BREXIT could be delayed if Jeremy Corbyn becomes Prime Minister or there is a hung Parliament, Brussels chiefs fear. As Labour closed in on the Tories in recent weeks – concerns about having no overall winner in today’s election have become very real. Civil servants have now been told to prepare for the possibility of a hung parliament amid fears that Theresa May won’t win a majority. And if it takes a while to form a Government, it could delay our EU exit talks which are set to start in just 11 days time. EU officials admitted Brussels would be willing to push back the start date if a new government in London requested more time to prepare.

Sky News
When Theresa May made her shock announcement on 18 April calling a General Election, she said it was “to make a success of Brexit”. That task looks much harder now. A hung parliament surely throws the Prime Minister’s preferred Brexit timetable into doubt. First, a government may not be in place by 19 June, when detailed negotiations with Brussels’ chief negotiator Michel Barnier are due to begin. And if there is to be another general election later this year or early next year, the whole two-year plan for Brexit could be wrecked.

Telegraph
The prospect of a hung Parliament would throw serious doubt over Brexit negotiations, due to begin in earnest in just 10 days. The BBC/Sky/ITV poll put the Conservatives on 314 seats, Labour on 266, the Scottish National Party on 34, Liberal Democrats on 14, Plaid Cymru on three and Greens on one. The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has set June 19 as his favoured date for the start of talks, due to last around 14-18 months. But Brussels officials have indicated that the date is not set in stone, meaning it could be delayed to take account of any change in the UK Government. What cannot easily be delayed, however, is the date of Britain’s departure from the EU, which is due to take place exactly two years after the triggering of the Article 50 Brexit process on March 29 2019, whether or not a withdrawal deal has been reached.

Express
PAUL Nuttall has accused Theresa May of putting “Brexit in jeopardy” after exit polls revealed Britain could be set for a hung parliament. The Ukip leader tweeted: “If the exit poll is true then Theresa May has put Brexit in jeopardy. I said at the start this election was wrong. Hubris.” Earlier on Thursday evening, a joint BBC/Sky/ITV exit poll predicted that the Conservatives will win 314 seats, Labour 266, Liberal Democrats 14, the SNP 34, and UKIP 0. This would mean that Westminster is heading for a hung parliament, with the Tories projected to lose 12 seats. And, while the Conservatives are set to be the largest party they will be without an overall majority.

Guardian
Ukip’s vote, which reached 4 million in 2015, collapsed in the early hours of Friday morning, with Labour and the Conservatives slicing deep into its support and putting Paul Nuttall’s future as party leader in jeopardy. The party’s vote share was down to about 2%, compared with 12.6% under the then leader Nigel Farage in 2015, when Ukip gained one MP. eUkip had been on about 4% in opinion polls and was virtually wiped out in local elections a month ago. The general election result looked set to further increase the pressure on Nuttall, who stood in Boston and Skegness, the constituency that voted most enthusiastically for Brexit in June 2016. By about 3am the party had racked up more than £30,000 in lost deposits.

Farage

Express
NIGEL Farage has hinted at a return to politics to secure Britain’s exit from the EU amid fears that a Labour-led coalition government could force a second referendum. Speaking to BBC News as election results continue to pour in, the former Ukip leader said Britain is “staring down the barrel of a second referendum”. Mr Farage said: “I was thrilled to lead Ukip, to pressure Cameron into offering a referendum. We triggered Article 50, I was thrilled, I thought it was all done. “If we get a coalition with him [Jeremy Corbyn] and the SNP and whoever else we may well be looking down the barrel of a second referendum.”

Sun
NIGEL Farage said this morning he would have “absolutely no choice” but to return to politics if Jeremy Corbyn gets into power as he hinted at a second Brexit referendum. He voiced concerns over the possibility of a Labour and SNP coalition as it was confirmed there would be a hung parliament today – and what it could mean for Brexit negotiations. He said if Theresa May loses in her bid to retain a Conservative majority in the General Election “we may well be looking down the barrel of a second referendum” as he vowed to return to politics if Corbyn saw success. This has now been confirmed as the outcome as the Tories failed to keep a majority. The former Ukip leader told the BBC: “If we get a Corbyn election, then Brexit is in trouble.”

Mail
Nigel Farage tonight warned Britain is ‘staring down the barrel’ of a second Brexit referendum if Jeremy Corbyn pulls off an unlikely election victory. The former Ukip leader claimed the mission of getting Britain out of the EU could prove to be ‘unfinished business’. Mr Farage told the BBC he was reluctant to return to the political front lines but that he was prepared to do so if needed to defend Brexit. 
Ukip’s vote evaporated tonight as the results emerged but split between Labour and the Tories in defiance of expectations it would flood to Mrs May.   Brexit talks are due to begin in Brussels in just 10 days time – but Mr Farage said he feared the start of talks could now be pushed back. If Labour do seize power, they plan to scrap all the work done on Mrs May‘s Brexit mission and push for a softer deal on quitting the EU. Britain remains locked into the two year Article 50 process that is due to expire on March 29, 2019.  

BBC News
Nigel Farage has said he would have “no choice” but to return to politics if Brexit was under threat, as UKIP look unlikely to win any seats. The former UKIP leader said “we may be looking down the barrel of a second (EU) referendum”. The BBC general election forecast suggests that the Conservatives will be the largest party, but finish just short of having a Commons majority. Party leader Paul Nuttall said Theresa May had put Brexit “in jeopardy”. He said he believed this election was wrong from the start, adding: “Hubris.” Deputy Chairwoman Suzanne Evans described the poll as “shocking” and said if right, “Brexit at risk and Marxists at large”. UKIP had no MPs at the end of the last parliament, after Douglas Carswell left the party in March.

May

Telegraph
Theresa May’s future as Prime Minister and leader of the Conservatives was being openly questioned after her decision to hold a snap election disastrously backfired. With Britain facing a hung parliament, Mrs May pledged to offer “stability” if the Tories end up as the largest party with the most votes, as expected. But Conservative former minister Anna Soubry said she should “consider her position” and take personal responsibility for a “dreadful” campaign and a “deeply flawed” manifesto after choosing to go to the country three years early in the hope of extending her majority.

Times
A humiliated Theresa May called today for a “period of stability” as she was urged to resign after her gamble on a snap election backfired. A hung parliament was called after the Tories failed to win in Labour’s heartlands and lost ground in the south as voters rejected her appeal for a personal mandate to negotiate Brexit. The results largely confirmed a shock exit poll, and the BBC forecast with only tens of constituencies left to declare that the Tories would win 316 seats, Labour 265, SNP 34 and Lib Dems 13, Plaid Cymru three, Green one and others 18. That would leave Mrs May short of an overall majority, although it would prevent Labour from seeking to construct its own governing coalition.

Sky News
Theresa May is this morning facing calls to resign as Prime Minister after her snap election gamble spectacularly backfired. Hopes of a Conservative landslide were replaced by the reality of a hung parliament in the early hours of Friday morning as voters rejected her appeal for a personal mandate to negotiate Brexit. Sky News’ projection is for the Conservatives to remain the largest party on 315 to 321 seats – with 326 required for a majority. Labour are projected to win between 260 and 266 seats – more than under both Ed Miliband and Gordon Brown.

ITV News
Prime Minister Theresa May is facing calls to resign after her gamble on a snap election dramatically backfired with the Conservatives falling short of a majority. The Tories are the largest party but have fallen short of commanding the House of Commons and will now need support from minor parties to attempt to govern. The hung parliament and impending political crisis, which has seen the pound plunge in trading, comes less than two weeks before Brexit negotiations are scheduled to begin. Mrs May said her party would deliver “stability” for the country but made no comment on her own position in the wake of a politically devastating result for her leadership.

Mail
A shaky Theresa May vowed to fight on today despite suffering catastrophic losses as her election gamble humiliatingly backfired – leaving a hung parliament just 10 days before Brexit talks are due to start. As the Tories’ Commons majority was brutally stripped away by voters, Mrs May faced open calls from her own MPs to ‘consider her position’ as a jubilant Jeremy Corbyn demanded she make way for him to become PM. But an ashen-faced Mrs May, who called the contest three years early in a bid to capitalise on sky-high poll ratings, insisted the Conservatives were still the largest party with an expected 319 seats. She insisted the country needed a ‘period of stability’, adding: ‘It is incumbent on us to ensure that we have that.’

Boris

Telegraph
Boris Johnson’s odds of being the next prime minister have been slashed from 66/1 to 5/1 as the election result cast doubt on Theresa May’s future. As the results rolled in, it appeared Mrs May’s election gamble had backfired, putting her Brexit plans in chaos as the Conservative majority was predicted to be wiped out. The vote meant a hung parliament was the most likely outcome, leaving Mrs May’s premiership in serious doubt.  After Mr Johnson retained his seat in Uxbridge and South Ruislip, he seemed in a hurry to leave the count at Brunel University. In his victory speech Mr Johnson said: “It is early to comment on the events unfolding tonight in this General Election.

Labour

Times
Labour secured significant gains across the country in a huge personal victory for Jeremy Corbyn which could hand left-wing supporters control of the party for years. Mr Corbyn’s allies heralded gains of more than 25 seats as vindication of the leader’s “positive politics”. They argued that it showed there was widespread support for policies which had been dismissed by moderates as too left-wing, including nationalising the railways and tax rises for businesses and the very wealthy. An exit poll released at 10pm last night was the first indication that Mr Corbyn was on course to win more than 260 seats, far better than had been expected.

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