EU

Mail
New EU rules could ban the UK from changing its clocks in the autumn and spring, a report warns today. Brussels is planning to end the practice of ‘daylight saving’ across the EU following claims that it is unpopular. The move would mean EU countries having to choose to adopt permanent summer or winter time, leaving Belfast potentially having to decide whether to align itself with clocks in the Republic or the rest of the UK, peers warned. It is not due to come in until after Britain has left the EU next year. But a Lords committee report warns that, under the draft withdrawal agreement, the UK would have to adopt the change during the Brexit transition period.

Guardian
A no-deal Brexit could cause a clock conundrum for Belfast, peers have warned, because of European commission plans to end the convention of changing the clocks twice a year. The move follows research that found the practice was unpopular and will require EU countries to choose to adopt permanent summer or winter time. It means clocks in Northern Ireland could end up being one hour out from either London or Dublin if Brexit negotiations fail, and Belfast would potentially have to decide whether to align itself with clocks in the Republic of Ireland or the rest of the UK. If Northern Ireland and Ireland were to operate on different times then this would likely cause significant confusion at the Irish border – the arrangements for which are already one of the biggest stumbling blocks in Brexit negotiations.

Mirror
The EU wants to ban British Summer Time, and there may be nothing we can do to stop it. The European Commission has proposed a new law that will ban EU member states from observing daylight saving time, putting a stop to changing the clocks for summer and winter. And if the change is pushed through during the Brexit transition period, Britain will have no power to stop it. It leaves the UK in a race against time to block the ban before March 29th, when Britain will leave the EU, but remain bound by its rules for at least two years during the ‘transition period’.

Sun
MEDDLING Eurocrats are plotting to scrap British Summer Time – and ban Brits from moving the clocks forward in autumn. The barmy EU directive could spell the end of the autumn lie-in on October 28. It comes despite a Lords report ruling that a change goes against EU law. The move would mean EU countries having to choose between adopting a permanent summer or winter time – meaning Belfast would have to decide whether to align its clocks with London or Dublin. Peers accused Brussels of overstepping the mark, saying it “does not comply” with EU rules on letting countries decide law for themselves where possible.

Express
FOOD and livestock will have to undergo checks when being shipped from England, Scotland and Wales to Northern Ireland after Brexit, the EU’s chief Brexit negotiator has insisted as tensions soar between Brussels and London over the latest deadlock. Michel Barnier denied the move would amount to a new border cutting Northern Ireland off from the rest of the UK and stressed that it could not be blamed for undermining the integrity of the UK. The issue of a Northern Ireland ‘backstop’, which is needed in the event of a no-deal Brexit, has brought negotiations for the UK to leave the EU to a standstill.

Express
DAVID Davis has sparked another “Battle of Britain” as he threatens a no-fly zone for EU planes in UK airspace in a shock move. The former-Brexit Secretary is set to adopt an even more militant attitude towards Brussels as he lashed out at Theresa May and called for a change in tactics to a more uncompromising approach in Brexit negotiations. He hit out for Mrs May’s proposal to extend the transition period for withdrawing the EU by a year. There have been claims that planes will not fly between the UK and EU because of a hard-Brexit.

Brexit

Times
Theresa May will tell MPs today that 95 per cent of the Brexit deal is done in a desperate bid to regain momentum in her negotiations. The prime minister will say that she has struck a range of agreements, including with Spain over Gibraltar and with Cyprus over a military base, in order to get the final deal over the line. She will even suggest that a deal on services is almost complete. She is likely to be pressed by MPs on the concessions she has made in these areas but is unlikely to spell them out today.

Mail
A deal to take Britain out of the EU is ’95 per cent settled’, Theresa May will tell MPs today. In an upbeat assessment, she will try to dispel suggestions talks have stalled after a series of setbacks. The Prime Minister will set out a string of areas where there is consensus, including ‘broad agreement on the structure and scope of the future relationship’ and agreement on how disputes between the two sides will be resolved after Brexit.

Independent
Theresa May is to say 95 per cent of the Brexit deal is settled as she seeks to quell mounting frustration at her handling of EU divorce negotiations. In a Commons statement on Monday following talks with European leaders in Brussels, the prime minister will insist the “shape of the deal across the vast majority” of the withdrawal agreement is now clear. But she will also reiterate her refusal to compromise over the Irish border, one of the key issues yet to be resolved with just over five months until Britain leaves the EU.

Mail
The campaign to ‘park’ Britain in a Norway-style EU deal has been boosted by support from Labour Brexiteer Frank Field and Tory Remainer Nicky Morgan. In a surprise move, Mr Field said: ‘I want a binding motion that would mean, if we don’t get a deal, the default mode for the government is that we join the EEA [European Economic Area] and then work towards a Canada-style free trade deal.’ Mrs Morgan, who backed Theresa May’s Chequers deal, said EEA membership was now ‘the only realistic way forward’ and favoured a ‘staged withdrawal via access to the single market.’

Budget

Times
Philip Hammond is preparing to say that Whitehall departments will get above-inflation budget increases in next year’s spending review if Britain emerges with a Brexit deal. The Treasury is under pressure to give more details on how austerity has ended. Fellow ministers, backbenchers and Labour have called for Mr Hammond to do more in the budget. The timing is awkward for the chancellor, given the uncertainty caused by Brexit negotiations and the £10 billion bill arising from Theresa May’s conference spending plans. Her pledge for the NHS, which will cost £83.6 billion over five years, also means that the Treasury must find £7 billion next year, £11 billion in 2020, £16 billion in 2021, £21 billion in 2022 and £28 billion in 2023.

Second referendum

Express
CIVIL Servants are beginning plans to betray Brexit by beginning secret plans for a second referendum amid fears Theresa May is unable to get Parliament to back a deal, after 670,000 protestors marched on London calling for another vote. Staff at the Department for Exiting the European Union are said to have role-played the likely actions the Prime Minister will undertake in a “war games” scenario, according to The Sunday Times. Brexiteers Boris Johnson and Jacob Ree-Mogg were included in the war-game as well as James McGrory, the People’s Vote director.

Conservative Party

Sun
DEFIANT Theresa May vows to do it “my way” and plough on with her Brexit plan — even if she risks losing her job. Writing for The Sun, the PM insists she will make the “right choices, not the easy ones” as pressure grows from plots to oust her. She insists: “I don’t think about what the implications are for me”. The PM also takes a big dig at hard Brexiteers who offer more simple solutions to solving the Brexit quagmire, saying she will keep on making “the right choices, not the easy ones” Mrs May’s intervention comes amid mounting speculation that David Davis’s allies are on the verge of mounting a coup to depose the PM because of her Chequers blueprint for a softer Brexit.

Telegraph
Theresa May is facing a Cabinet revolt after attempting to shore up support for her Brexit plans during an hour-and-a-half long conference call with her ministers. Esther McVey, the Work and Pensions Secretary, is said to have told the Prime Minister that she was “devastated” by plans to extend the Brexit transition period in a bid to strike a deal with the EU. Sajid Javid, the Home Secretary, warned the Prime Minister there must be a time limit on her customs backstop amid concerns that it could leave Britain indefinitely tied to Brussels.

Times
Theresa May is facing a rebellion by more than 40 of her MPs if she does not bow to fresh demands from Brexiteers in the next 48 hours. Downing Street has commissioned urgent legal advice to determine whether the prime minister must face down new demands by the European Research Group that could scupper a key part of the Brexit negotiations. Steve Baker, a leading officer for the group, has put down amendments to government legislation that would stop Northern Ireland being placed in a different regulatory and customs territory from the rest of Britain without a vote in the Stormont assembly.

Breitbart
Theresa May’s time as Prime Minister may be coming to an end, with MPs telling her to “bring her own noose” to a crunch meeting on Wednesday as former Brexit Secretary David Davis sets out his leadership stall. Theresa May was already under pressure over her many concessions to the European Union and attempts to agree a so-called ‘backstop’ with the bloc, which would keep the United Kingdom inside the EU Customs Union in order to avoid customs checks between the British province of Northern Ireland and the EU’s Republic of Ireland — effectively stopping the country from making new global trade deals after Brexit.

Westmonster
Theresa May’s leadership could be coming to an end as reports say 3 more Tory MPs are due to send in their letters to the 1922 Committee Chair to trigger a no-confidence vote in the PM. A Tory MP told The Sun he and 2 other colleagues would be sending in their letters today, whilst Brexit Minister Suella Braverman refused 3 times to say if she would support the PM in a no-confidence vote in an interview. To add to the PM’s woes, Conservative MP Andrea Jenkyns tweeted urging her colleagues to put their letters in saying: “This is our last chance to save Brexit & install a strong Leader who will put Britain’s interests first.”

Labour Party

Mail
Labour could back a second referendum following the ‘very significant’ march by protesters calling for a final say on Brexit, Sir Keir Starmer said yesterday. 
The shadow Brexit secretary broke ranks with Jeremy Corbyn to praise the so-called ‘People’s Vote’ rally, which attracted up to 700,000 demonstrators to London on Saturday. Sir Keir said last month that Labour would vote against any deal struck by Theresa May. The party’s official position is to push for a general election if the deal gets voted down. But Sir Keir yesterday acknowledged that Labour could not force an election – and suggested it may then switch to backing a second referendum.

Plastic

Telegraph
British recycling and household waste has been found dumped in Malaysia, The Telegraph can disclose. Plastic products sold in the UK that are intended for reprocessing have been apparently discarded by waste companies at several sites around the south-east Asian country. Reporters from The Telegraph and Unearthed, Greenpeace’s investigative unit, found bales, including an envelope with an address in the North of England, Morrisons’ milk cartons and supermarket carrier bags outside a waste facility in the west of Malaysia. Many of the shopping items seen had use-by dates within the next year or two and the letters displayed recent date stamps.

Mail
Plastic straws, drinks stirrers and cotton buds could be banned as soon as next year, Michael Gove will announce today. The Environment Secretary says only legal enforcement will protect Britain’s environment from the scourge of throwaway plastic. Many pub and takeaway chains, including McDonald’s, have introduced voluntary bans on plastic straws. Most supermarkets have also swapped plastic stems on cotton buds for paper alternatives. But Mr Gove will say that the country ‘needs to do more’, adding: ‘Our precious oceans and the wildlife within need urgent protection from the devastation throwaway plastic items can cause.

Independent
A ban on use of plastic straws, drink stirrers and cotton buds could be in place by the end of next year, as part of government plans to curb the escalating problem of plastic clogging up Britain’s waterways. Michael Gove, the environment secretary, has vowed to “turn the tide on plastic pollution” by stamping out the use of 4.7 billion plastic straws, 316 million plastic stirrers and 1.8 billion plastic-stemmed cotton buds in England each year, many of which end up in rivers and seas. The ban was trailed earlier this year, but it drew criticism from some disability rights campaigners, as straws are vital to help people with conditions such as Parkinson’s disease or muscular dystrophy to consume food and drink safely.

NHS

Telegraph
NHS hospitals are wasting more than £5 million a year each on rubber gloves, a new report reveals. Health chiefs could pay for nearly 900 knee replacements or 800 hip replacements with the money some trusts spend procuring the needlessly expensive items, the document says. The report by NHS Improvement, which oversees hospitals in England, found huge variation in the price different trusts for the same equipment. While boxes of 100 rubber examination gloves are available from 65p, some hospital bosses are paying up to £1.84.
Nearly seven million gloves are used by hospitals each year.

Times
Hospitals are wasting millions of pounds a year on commonly used items such as gloves and syringes, a watchdog has said. NHS Improvement called on bosses to use a specialist tool to see if they could save money on purchases. The price comparison checker lets hospitals find the most and least expensive options for more than a million products. It said that trusts would save £5.6 million a year if they all paid the minimum price for a box of examination gloves, for which prices vary from 65p to £1.84. They would save £3.7 million a year if they paid the minimum for radiology syringes, where prices for a pack of 50 range from £324 to £553.

Mail
Targeting the source of advanced prostate cancer with radiotherapy after the disease has spread can increase survival chances by 11 per cent. Experts say the ‘monumental findings’ could change how advanced cancers are treated. Patients whose prostate cancer has spread are typically given hormone therapy to reduce or stop the production of testosterone, as the molecule can encourage the cancer’s growth. But these findings suggest radio- therapy – which uses high-energy radiation to kill cancer cells – is also effective. It was previously thought there would be little benefit in blasting the prostate tumour if the disease had spread to other parts of the body.

Times
Thousands of men with advanced prostate cancer could have their lives extended thanks to a “monumental” breakthrough in treatment. One of the largest clinical trials for the disease found that radiotherapy boosted survival rates by 11 per cent for men whose cancer had spread to nearby lymph nodes or bones. The result is likely to change the care given to about 3,000 men every year in England alone and could benefit many more around the world. Researchers found that treating the prostate with radiotherapy in men whose cancer was locally advanced boosted three-year survival rates to 81 per cent, compared with 73 per cent among those receiving standard care.

Mail
Superbugs will kill more people than cancer and diabetes combined by 2050 unless something is done to tackle antibiotic resistance, MPs have warned. Despite drives to reduce prescription rates, British doctors are still doling out twice as many antibiotics as some of their European counterparts, a report has found. Experts have warned that routine hospital operations could become too dangerous if common medications become ineffective. They fear the antibiotics crisis is getting worse, with growing concerns the drugs are losing their effect and can no longer treat many infections.

County lines’

Times
A police force has failed to prosecute a single “county lines” drug dealer in a city where hundreds of children are at risk of exploitation by criminal networks, The Times can reveal. Nearly 500 children in Bradford have been identified as having been exposed to organised crime groups but West Yorkshire police has yet to bring a county lines case to court in its area, despite growing political incentives. The exploitation of tens of thousands of children nationwide to transport and deal drugs has led to hundreds of arrests and has been cited as a big contributor to the violent crime epidemic.

Prison

Mail
Shocking footage has revealed prisoners taking drugs, displaying mobile phones and violently hitting each other in UK prisons. Footage from several jails across the country has highlighted the crisis faced by the current prison system. A video taken from within Liverpool jail shows one prisoner laid zombie-like on the floor and shaking as another stumbles around the room smoking from a pipe thought to contain the drug Spice, reports the Sunday Mirror. The man with a tattoo on his left arm tries to grab hold of a wall for support as he moves around but another man humiliates him and pulls down his shorts.

BBC

Times
BBC spending on consultants has jumped by nearly 40 per cent in a year as the corporation struggles to deal with internal and strategic crises. The broadcaster spent almost £4.4 million of licence fee-payers’ money with external consultants in 2017-18, up from £3.14 million the previous year. The Big Four accounting and professional services companies — PWC, Deloitte, Ernst and Young and KPMG — were among the BBC’s ten most-used consultancies last year, according to figures obtained by The Times under freedom of information legislation.

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