Farage

Independent
Nigel Farage is planning to launch a new, pro-Brexit party if the anti-Islam campaigner Anne-Marie Waters wins the Ukip leadership election next week, sources have claimed. According to the
 Mail on Sunday, Mr Farage has told friends he will set up the breakaway party because he believes Ukip will be “finished” if Ms Waters takes charge. The proposed new party is not yet believed to have a name but talks are reportedly under way with Ukip’s former chief donor Aaron Banks. Now the bookies’ favourite to become Ukip’s fourth leader in the last year, Ms Waters is a director of pressure groups Sharia Watch and Pegida, which stands for Patriotic Europeans Against the Islamisation of the West. Both are widely described as anti-Islam organisations, although Ms Waters insists it is not factually correct to label her as a “far right” candidate.

Sun
NIGEL FARAGE is set to start his own new version of Ukip – if a far-right anti-Islamic candidate storms to power as the party’s leader. According to the Mail on Sunday, the former chief has told friends he will set up a break-away party if Anne Marie Waters gets elected. Ms Waters, who founded an anti-Islam pressure group, is one of 11 people standing to become leader – and the winner will be announced at Friday’s conference. And Mr Farage is said to be angry at her claims that millions of Brits agree with her that Islam is evil. He’s told friends he is ready to set up a new movement if she wins control of the party. Waters’ candidacy has divided the party, with some members threatening to quit if she wins the race to succeed Paul Nuttall.

EU

Sun
GERMANY and France are plotting to keep the UK tied to a two-tier EU, it is claimed. French premier Emmanuel Macron and newly re-elected German Chancellor Angela Merkel will push to create a less formal relationship with the EU – aimed at the UK. And it left one MP fearing that Brexit could be in serious danger. The unnamed senior Tory told the Express: “A serious effort to stop Brexit is now underway. I am very worried that we will now never leave the EU. “The danger is that we are on course for nothing to have changed five years after we voted for Brexit. “That gives an opportunity for all sorts of machinations and new offers to try to keep us back in.

Express
BREXIT negotiations risk further stalemate as EU chiefs will demand Britain more than double Theresa May’s €20 billion offer, senior European diplomats have warned. David Davis, Britain’s Brexit secretary, and Michel Barnier, the European Union’s Brexit negotiator, will lock horns in tomorrow’s fourth round of talks in order to push the agenda to  post-Brexit trade with the EU. Mr Barnier has repeatedly said trade talks cannot begin until a final divorce bill has been agreed.  Following Theresa May’s crunch Brexit speech in Florence on Friday, she announced that Britain “will honour commitments” made during its EU membership and deliver a payment of €20 billion to the EU. Now, the final bill is expected to be twice this amount, and Britain would need to issue an agreement-in-principle on this to begin trade talks, senior EU diplomats confirmed to a Sunday paper.

Express
THE European Court of Justice is attempting a massive “power grab” and threatening the UK’s national sovereignty, a QC has warned. British lawyer Marina Wheeler QC, who is married to Brexit-champion Boris Johnson, has claimed Brussels courts are threatening UK sovereignty by unlawfully overruling Britain’s terror policy. Ms Wheeler, herself a hardline Brexiteer, believe the ECJ is putting UK’s national security at risk. In 2017 there has already been the Manchester bombing, two major atrocities in London and a mass-killing in Barcelona. To fight the threat of terrorism, the UK uses a technique of collecting bulk communications data, such as looking at internet history.

Brexit

Telegraph
Philip Hammond’s allies have accused Boris Johnson of being “simple minded” and warned that the Brexit transition period may need to be extended until after the next election. Mr Johnson has made clear that a Brexit “implementation period” must last no longer than two years, meaning that the UK will effectively leave the EU by 2021. However the Chancellor and other ministers including Amber Rudd, the Home Secretary, have argued that the UK will need at least an extra year so that businesses can adjust. The deepening Cabinet split comes after Mrs May thought she had brokered a truce between Mr Hammond and Mr Johnson with a keynote speech in Florence on Friday.

Guardian
The Brexit secretary, David Davis, will arrive in Brussels on Monday to begin a fresh round of talks about British withdrawal from the EU against a backdrop of renewed cabinet infighting over Britain’s negotiating strategy. Davis will meet the EU’s chief negotiator,  Michel Barnier, in the Belgian capital in the morning to commence the fourth round of negotiations. The meeting follows Theresa May’s speech in Florence on Friday in which she offered to keep paying into the EU purse for a two-year transitional period after Brexit  in 2019. Barnier welcomed the speech, declaring that May “expressed a constructive spirit” and a “willingness to move forward”. Although UK ministers presented a united front about the plans, which were accompanied by a more conciliatory tone than previous speeches, there were reports of backroom disagreements between the foreign secretary, Boris Johnson, and the chancellor, Philip Hammond. 

Independent
David Davis has sought to calm Tory anger over Theresa May’s Brexit speech by saying the UK will not face a £40bn divorce bill as a result of leaving the EU. Ahead on the next round of crunch talks with Brussels, the  Brexit Secretary said reports around the final financial settlement were “made up” and claimed the power of the European Court of Justice (ECJ) would end in 2019 when Britain formally leaves the bloc. Ms May used a landmark speech in Florence to propose a two-year transition period after Brexit with similar arrangements, prompting concern among Tory Eurosceptics over the prospect of staying in the single market and keeping freedom of movement. However cracks are already beginning to show at the top of the party amid reports Boris Johnson has demanded commitments Britain will not adopt any new EU rules during the transition period.

Labour Party

Express
TRADITIONAL Labour voters are still prepared to abandon the party over failing to support Brexit and could provide the key to who wins the next general election, new research has found. Despite claims by Jeremy Corbyn he is preparing to be Prime Minister for a decade, the findings of polling carried out for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) found low income voters are “up for grabs” and at the last election were “pulled in different directions”. The research by Professor Matthew Goodwin at the University of Kent and Prof Oliver Heath of Royal Holloway University, draws on data from the British Election Study (BES) and found that while 42 per cent of low income voters backed Labour this year, the Tories picked up 37 per cent just five points behind. The parties were neck-and-neck among manual workers with 39 per cent each, while Labour has a small lead among full-time workers of 42 per cent to 36 per cent. By contrast, high income voters remained much more likely to vote Conservative than Labour by 53 per cent compared to 24 per cent.

Telegraph
Labour was reduced to a “laughing stock”, in the words of its own MPs, after the party decided Brexit will not be debated at this year’s party conference. After a day in which deep divisions within the party over Brexit were exposed, the pro-Jeremy Corbyn group Momentum told members and unions to choose other topics for debate at the conference in Brighton to avoid a public row over the biggest issue facing the country. It came as a former Labour frontbencher suggested that managed migration was “racist” and Mr Corbyn came under intense pressure to commit to staying in the single market and customs union. Andrew Gwynne, Labour’s election coordinator, admitted earlier in the day that Brexit could “tear the party in two” if MPs and party members could not reach agreement in a “comradely fashion”.

Times
Jeremy Corbyn’s supporters have seen off an attempt to bind Labour to a policy of staying in the European single market after Brexit. Union delegates joined Momentum members to vote against a main debate over the party’s Brexit policy at this week’s conference. Writing in The Times, Sir Keir Starmer, the shadow Brexit secretary, suggests that Britain could remain a member of the single market in all but name, highlighting the risk of new divisions within the party leadership over the issue. Mr Corbyn had used an interview to renew his opposition to Britain remaining within the economic bloc, suggesting that it could prevent Labour from fulfilling its policy agenda.

Guardian
Jeremy Corbyn avoided an embarrassing row on Sunday over Labour’s position on the single market and free movement after party members voted to exclude Brexit from a series of debates at the party’s annual conference. Delegates picked eight “contemporary motions” including on housing, the NHS and social care but decided against motions about the party’s policy on the future relationship with the EU. Campaigners were hoping to debate the idea of Labour fighting to keep Britain in the single market permanently and continue free movement, which polls suggest enjoy widespread support among members. Momentum, the grassroots pro-Corbyn group, was thought to be highly influential in the result of the ballot because it emailed members to recommend four topics that were chosen. It justified the decision to leave Brexit  off the list by insisting that the conference would debate and vote on EU policy on Monday – but this will not include the more controversial motions.

Sky News
Jeremy Corbyn has avoided a potentially embarrassing row over Brexit, after delegates at the Labour conference blocked a meaningful vote on the issue. Members and trade union officials picked eight other “contemporary” subjects on the party’s “priorities” ballot to vote on instead. Both groups got to pick four topics, with trade unions backing the Grenfell fire, public sector pay, workers’ rights and growth and investment. Local Labour parties put Brexit fifth – behind the NHS, housing, social care and rail services.

BBC News
Pro-EU Labour MPs have expressed anger after no Brexit motions were chosen to be voted on at party conference. Instead, delegates chose Grenfell Tower, rail, growth and investment, public sector pay, workers’ rights, the NHS, housing and social care. Party sources said there would be no vote on contentious issues such as single market membership. But shadow chancellor John McDonnell said there would be a debate on Brexit and a “very thorough” one. He said: “There will be the normal report from the national executive committee and if people want to vote on that they can.”

Independent
Labour MP branded her own party a “laughing stock” after its conference voted not to debate Brexit, deciding eight other issues are more important. In a victory for Jeremy Corbyn, the Labour leadership avoided a conference showdown that could have triggered a pro-EU policy shift in favour of permanent single market membership. But it came at the cost of accusations of a “fix”, after Corbyn-backing Momentum delegates were accused of working behind the scenes to block a vote on Brexit.
The two MPs leading the Labour Campaign for the Single Market immediately hit out at the decision as an embarrassment and a disgrace. Alison McGovern told The Independent: “We needed to talk about Brexit. It’s the biggest issue for our country and will be the biggest issue for whoever is the next government.

Mail
Jeremy Corbyn refused to rule out keeping free movement after Brexit today as he hinted that a transition period could go on indefinitely. The Labour leader desperately dodged when pressed whether loose immigration rules should be maintained after we formally leave the EU. And he said it was ‘impossible’ to put a timescale on how long the status quo should be maintained before ties are finally cut. The desperate flannelling, in an interview to kick off the Labour conference in Brighton this morning, came as Labour faced a huge split on Brexit. Some 30 MPs have signed a letter demanding that the UK stays in the single market and there is pressure for a vote to be held by delegates this week.  
Pro-EU demonstrators also marched outside the conference venue today, calling for Labour to reverse the result of the historic referendum.  

Mirror
Pro-Remain MPs have been left furious after Labour conference delegates voted NOT to debate Brexit . Jeremy Corbyn was spared the possibility of delegates voting for a thorny, and potentially embarrassing, policy change to stay in the single market permanently. But the vote met with a furious reaction from pro-EU Labour MP Chris Leslie, who tweeted: “No Brexit vote at conference?! How utterly ridiculous. Many members will be shocked at manoeuvring to avoid biggest issue of our time”. Heidi Alexander, of the Labour campaign for the single market, added: “I am gobsmacked. How can Labour not have a full & proper debate on Brexit policy? We will be a laughing stock.”

Illegal immigration

Mail
Fears that illegal migrants are finding a new route to Britain have been borne out by new figures yesterday. Officials said 1,251 had been caught trying to board ferries from Bilbao in northern Spain to Portsmouth in the first eight months of this year. That compares to 436 in the whole of 2016. Brittany Ferries, which runs the ferry route, has called on port security in Spain to be tightened to stop offenders repeatedly trying to board ships. A company spokesman said most of those involved are young, male Albanians who are ‘well-organised’ and repeatedly target the port’s perimeter in Bilbao. An increasing number of migrants are taking the short route from northern Africa to southern Spain and then working their way north. Others are avoiding northern French ports as security is harder there. 
Portsmouth City Council is looking after more than 40 asylum-seeking teenage boys who arrived unaccompanied.

German elections

Telegraph
Chancellor Angela Merkel clinched a fourth term in Germany’s election on Sunday, but her victory was clouded by the hard-right AfD party winning its first seats in parliament. Merkel, who after 12 years in power held a double-digit lead for most of the campaign, scored around 32.9 percent of the vote with her conservative Christian Union (CDU/CSU) bloc. Its nearest rivals, the Social Democrats and their candidate Martin Schulz, came in a distant second, with a post-war record low 20.8 percent.

Times
The far right stormed into the German parliament for the first time in more than 50 years yesterday as it capitalised on fears about the influx of migrants under Angela Merkel, who held on for a fourth term as chancellor. More than five million voters ignored appeals from Mrs Merkel and other mainstream leaders not to back the Alternative for Germany (AfD) as it came third with 13 per cent of votes and about 90 seats in parliament. In the former East Germany it came second. The party’s success showed that Germany was not immune from the nationalism sweeping Europe and the United States as voters reject globalisation and mass immigration.

Star
ANGELA Merkel has been voted in for a fourth term as Germany’s chancellor following Sunday’s election. But her victory has been clouded by the hard-right Alternative for Deutschland (AfD) party coming in third – giving it up to 90 seats in the Bundestag (German Parliament). Merkel, who has been in power for 12 years, got 33% of the vote with her conservative Christian Union bloc. Its nearest rivals, the Social Democrats, came in second with 20.5% of the vote and quickly announced they won’t form a coalition with Merkel. This means Merkel will face having to look elsewhere for a coalition partner to give her a majority in the Bundestag. But in a bombshell for the German establishment, the far-right, anti-immigration AfD got around 12.6%, making it one of the country’s biggest political forces.

Sun
ANGELA Merkel has won a historic fourth successive term after Germany went to the polls on September 24 in a Federal Election. Meanwhile, right-wing nationalists made a historical breakthrough – here’s everything you need to know. Angela Merkel has secured a fourth term as Chancellor in Germany’s General Election but her victory was clouded by the hard-right AfD party winning its first seats in parliament. Merkel, who has been in power for 12 years, clinched about 33 per cent of the vote with her conservative Christian Union (CDU/CSU) bloc. 
It was the CDU’s worst result in almost 70 years, but enough for it to remain the largest party in parliament. Its nearest rivals, the Social Democrats and their candidate Martin Schulz, came in a distant second, with 20.5 per cent of the vote. But in a bombshell for the German establishment, the anti-Islam, anti-immigration Alternative for Germany (AfD) captured 12.6 per cent, making it the country’s third biggest political force.

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