Brexit

Telegraph
Michel Barnier has claimed Britain needs to be “educated” over Brexit as a war of words between the EU and the UK escalated with David Davis saying his opposite number had made the bloc look “silly”. Mr Barnier reportedly told a conference in Italy on Saturday that divorce proceedings would be an “educational process” for the British and that the UK needed to recognise the “serious consequences”  of withdrawal. But on Sunday Mr Davis ridiculed the tough tone taken by Mr Barnier at the close of Brexit negotiations last week when the EU’s chief negotiator claimed no progress had been made on key issues.

Mail
Brussels Brexit chief Michel Barnier yesterday threatened to teach Britain a lesson for leaving the EU, as the row over demands for a £90billion divorce payment boiled over. In an incendiary intervention, Mr Barnier said he wanted to use Brexit to ‘teach the British people and others what leaving the EU means’. Tory MPs branded the EU’s chief negotiator ‘patronising and arrogant’ – and said his comments showed Brussels was starting to panic about the loss of Britain’s financial contributions to the EU. The former French cabinet minister denied that he was trying to ‘blackmail’ the UK, but vowed to ‘educate’ British voters about the price they would pay for daring to leave the EU.

Independent
The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier has Brexit will be used to “teach the British people and others what leaving the EU means”. In highly inflammatory comments made to a conference in Italy on Saturday, Mr Barnier said it was his job to “educate” the UK about the price of leaving the EU “club”. Mr Barnier also said Brexit would be “an educational process” for the UK. “I have a state of mind – not aggressive … but I’m not naïve,” he told the Ambrosetti forum. “There are extremely serious consequences of leaving the single market, and they haven’t been explained to the British people. We intend to teach people … what leaving the single market means.”

Sun
THE EU’S Brexit negotiator has claimed he wants to “educate” Brits about leaving the European Union as “it hasn’t been explained to them properly”. Michel Barnier is becoming locked in a bitter war of words with British counterpart David Davis as talks continue to stutter. Speaking at a conference in Italy, Barnier accused the UK of “nostalgia” and said he wants to “teach the British people and others what leaving the EU means”. He said: “I have a state of mind – not aggressive… but I’m not naïve. “There are extremely serious consequences of leaving the single market and it hasn’t been explained to the British people. “We intend to teach people… what leaving the single market means.” The patronising speech received a sharp backlash from Brexit Secretary David Davis who said the EU is “frightened” and does “not want to talk about the future”.

BBC News
The EU’s Brexit negotiator has said he sees the process as an opportunity to “teach the British people and others what leaving the EU means”. Michel Barnier said he would never resort to blackmail but saw it as his job to “educate” the UK about the price it would pay for leaving the EU “club”. The UK has hit back, saying the EU does “not want to talk about the future”. Brexit Secretary David Davis said it was “frightened” and the UK would not be bounced into a divorce bill deal. The latest salvos come after a week of talks in Brussels about the UK’s withdrawal from the EU – scheduled to take place in March 2019 – which increased tensions between the two sides.

Huffington Post
EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier has ramped up the tension over Brexit talks after warning he is trying to “educate” the UK about the price of quitting the European Union. Barnier’s antagonistic tone underlines how the EU is wants to play hardball with the UK as much as a deterrent to other countries contemplating an exit. It comes after a terse round of negotiations between Barnier and Brexit Secretary David Davis last week. On The Andrew Marr Show on Sunday, Davis branded the EU as “silly” for claiming no progress is being made in the Brexit negotiations, and also dismissed reports the UK is set to pay a £50billion divorce bill as “nonsense” and “completely wrong”. But Barnier’s highly inflammatory comments made to a conference in Italy on Saturday made clear the men at the centre of the talks take very different positions. 

Guardian
The EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, has said the British people need to be educated about the consequences of leaving the single market, the latest in a series of blows traded by Brussels and UK government ministers after a bruising round of exit talks. In remarks likely to enrage UK ministers, Barnier said Brexit would be “an educational process” for the British public who voted to leave the EU. “I have a state of mind: not aggressive … but I’m not naive,” he told the Ambrosetti forum, an annual economic conference in northern Italy. “There are extremely serious consequences of leaving the single market and it hasn’t been explained to the British people,” he said, according to the BBC. “We intend to teach people … what leaving the single market means.”

Express
THE EU’s chief Brexit negotiator has claimed Britain needs to be “educated” over Brexit as a war of words escalated over the UK’s divorce bill. In remarks likely to enrage UK ministers, Mr Barnier reportedly said the Brexit divorce proceedings would be an “educational process” for the British public who voted to leave the EU  and the UK needed to recognise the “serious concequences” of withdrawal. Speaking to a conference in Italy, Mr Barnier said: “I have a state of mind: not aggressive… but I’m not naive. “There are extremely serious consequences of leaving the single market and it hasn’t been explained to the British people. 
We intend to teach people… what leaving the single market means.”

Independent
Influential cabinet figure and key Theresa May loyalist Damian Green has warned Conservative MPs to “back Brexit or get Jeremy Corbyn”. MPs return to the Commons next week and will move quickly into debates and votes on the crucial Repeal Bill, on which pro-Remain Conservatives will wield significant influence given Ms May’s slim majority. Writing in 
The Sunday Telegraph, Mr Green, who is First Secretary of State and as such effectively Deputy Prime Minister, said: “Few political debates have been as divisive as the European one. I fought as hard as I could on the Remain side, but I believe strongly that as a democrat I should respect the result, and that as a politician it is my duty to make the Brexit settlement as good as possible.

Sun
BRITAIN will have to dig deep to settle its obligations with the European Union, but it shouldn’t pay a penny more than is due. Reports that the Prime Minister is planning to sign off a £50billion deal, committing us to significant payments well after we leave, were described as “nonsense” by David Davis. We hope he’s telling the truth. The EU’s patronising chief negotiator Michel Barnier said this weekend the UK needs to be “educated” about the price of leaving the European club. 
We know what we have to do. That’s why this paper has said the Government should honour our commitments so we can move on to discussing the nuts and bolts of a free trade deal. Perhaps some education is in order in Brussels. Britain won’t refuse to pay a fair bill, but it’s not a soft touch either.

Conservative Party

Times
Theresa May is using the threat of a reshuffle to bring Tory troublemakers into line as she seeks to tighten her grip on Downing Street. Conservative Campaign Headquarters had expected the prime minister to overhaul jobs in the government after the party conference next month. However, she is now thought more likely to delay the shake-up, using her ability to reward supporters and punish rebels to reassert her authority after angering some MPs by vowing to lead the party into the next election. The threat will be seen as an attempt to rein in ministers with whom No 10 has clashed, including Sajid Javid, the communities secretary, Andrea Leadsom, the Commons leader, and Liam Fox, the international trade secretary.

Mirror
Theresa May and her allies have launched a desperate bid to prevent a Tory rebellion over Brexit as MPs return to battle after a long hot summer. The House of Commons meets for the first time in nearly seven weeks on Tuesday – and one of its first acts will be to vote on the so-called Repeal Bill. The Bill will let Britain change thousands of EU laws into UK law on 29 March 2019, the day we leave the EU. But Labour and some Tory MPs are furious at its inclusion of sweeping ‘Henry VIII’ powers to change the law without consulting MPs. Now the government has prompted a backlash by urging MPs not to show too much dissent – because it could get Jeremy Corbyn into Downing Street.

Guardian
Theresa May will face a testing week as parliament returns on Tuesday, with Conservative whips braced for battles with newly emboldened party rebels over the repeal bill.  Both May and the Brexit secretary, David Davis, warned MPs on Sunday they should not obstruct the bill’s passage via amendments or they will risk a victory for Labour’s leader, Jeremy Corbyn; remarks that drew ire from some Conservatives who insisted they had legitimate concerns about the extent of the bill’s powers. The European Union (withdrawal) bill, which will have its second reading on Thursday, is intended to transpose EU legislation into British law from the day the UK leaves the EU, but it is set to involve extensive use of so-called “Henry VIII powers” – laws that allow ministers to change primary legislation using secondary legislation without parliamentary scrutiny.

Sky News
Theresa May has been warned she faces a battle at Westminster over her Brexit legislation if she does not tackle concerns raised by Labour. The first full parliamentary debate on the legislation, known as the Repeal Bill, is due to be held in the House of Commons on Thursday. The Labour Party is expected to push for changes that would keep the UK in the single market and customs union during a transition period after Britain’s membership in the bloc ends in March 2019. Mrs May also 
faces a potential rebellion from Remain-supporting MPs within her own party, who might be tempted to back Labour. Some MPs fear the legislation will give ministers sweeping new powers.

Labour Party

Express
LABOUR rebels threatened to unleash a “complete sh**storm” on Parliament if Jeremy Corbyn agrees a deal with Theresa May to stop his MPs from blocking Brexit. The Labour leader has been warned by MPs not to do a “grubby deal” with the Tories to limit the debate on the European Union withdrawal bill. Parliament is expected to debate the bill when politicians return to Commons tomorrow after the summer break. And following news of a Tory rebellion, government whips are hoping to restrict the debate to six days – compared to the whopping 20 days it took to debate the Maastricht Treaty in 1993. And while Theresa May faces a potential uprising from her Remainer MPs, Mr Corbyn too has problems of his own.

Guardian
Labour’s Keir Starmer has warned Theresa May the government will face a parliamentary battle on the first Commons vote on controversial Brexit legislation unless she answers concerns about accountability. The shadow Brexit  secretary said the party would not hand May a blank cheque over the repeal bill, which is to have its second reading when parliament returns next week, and which he said would give ministers “very wide powers” that could override parliamentary scrutiny. Asked if his party would vote against the bill, which is intended to transpose EU law directly into UK law from when Britain leaves the European Union, Starmer said: “We haven’t reached that stage yet, but I have been very, very clear. Whilst we accept the result of the referendum, we are not giving a blank cheque to the government to do it in whichever way it wants because it is not in the public interest.”

Morning Star
LABOUR will vote against Brexit legislation this week if government ministers fail to address the long-standing issues that it has raised. Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer vowed yesterday that the party’s MPs would vote to stop handing ministers a “blank cheque to pass powers” if Labour’s concerns were not considered. The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, which is set to be debated on Thursday after MPs return to Westminster following their summer break, gives ministers “very wide powers,” he explained on BBC1’s Andrew Marr Show. Asked whether Labour would definitely vote against the legislation if Brexit Secretary David Davis rejected its concerns, Mr Starmer said: “I flagged these points up at the beginning of summer and said: ‘If you don’t address them, we will be voting against it’.”

Sun
LABOUR was split three different ways over Brexit after a former Cabinet minister accused her fellow MPs of trying to “wreck” Britain’s EU departure. Caroline Flint lashed out at deputy leader Tom Watson for saying the party may back staying in the single market indefinitely. She told BBC1’s Andrew Marr Show: “There are some colleagues who are trying to delay the inevitable”. She added: “I’m not going to be involved in wrecking for wrecking’s sake, I don’t think that’s the way forward”. On top of former Remain campaigner Ms Flint’s blast, Shadow Brexit Secretary Sir Keir Starmer also clashed with Mr Watson.

Mail
Labour should not ‘wreck for wrecking’s sake’ over Brexit, a former minister said yesterday. Caroline Flint said some of her fellow Labour MPs were seeking to ‘delay the inevitable’ by blocking the Government’s Great Repeal Bill which begins its passage through Parliament this week. Keir Starmer, the party’s Brexit spokesman, yesterday said they would try to vote down the legislation unless ministers made a string of concessions. But Miss Flint, who campaigned for Remain, said the party had a duty to respect the referendum result and allow the legislation to pass. ‘There are some colleagues who want to think of ways they can delay the inevitable,’ she said. ‘There are legitimate questions to be asked – that’s fair enough – but I am not going to be involved in wrecking for wrecking’s sake.’

Independent
Jeremy Corbyn’s allies are putting forward a new compromise deal they believe will secure Labour’s left a place in future leadership contests, The Independent  can reveal. Under the proposal, Mr Corbyn’s supporters would make a key concession to their existing plan to change rules governing how MPs win a place on the leadership ballot. Insiders at Labour’s union backers, who would be crucial to any proposal’s success, have also signalled to The Independent  they would welcome the proposal, which would require only 10 per cent of MPs to support a candidate to get them on the ballot. Despite Mr Corbyn’s gains during the general election, critics in the party have vowed to fight alterations to the rule book to make it easier for MPs to run for the leadership. A fight over the issue is set to play out at the party’s autumn conference in Brighton later this month, which is the first since Mr Corbyn defied internal and external critics to strengthen Labour’s Commons presence.

Hijabs in school

Mail
A Muslim campaigner has called for hijabs to be banned in primary schools after it was revealed a fifth of 800 primary schools now list the headscarf in their uniform policy. This is despite the fact a hijab is usually only worn by young women after puberty and in front of men for modesty reasons – not by primary school children. Campaigners have said it should be ‘fiercely resisted’ and claimed it could ‘sexualise’ young children.  A survey by Sunday Times found 18 per cent of 800 primary schools, including Church of England primaries, include the hijab in their uniform policy. Across England’s 17,000 primary schools the figure is likely to run into thousands.   In Birmingham 46 per cent of 72 primary schools whose websites were checked had the hijab in their written online uniform policy. In Tower Hamlets 34 per cent of 68 primaries had an online headscarf policy and in Luton the figure was 36 per cent.

Health

Times
The NHS will suffer its worst winter in recent history unless it gets up to £350 million for extra beds and staff, health chiefs warned last night. Waiting times will increase and patients will be put in jeopardy because NHS trusts have “insufficient capacity to meet extra expected demand”, according to NHS Providers. The industry body, which represents 229 of the 233 NHS trusts in England, said an extra £1 billion that the government gave councils to improve social care was failing to get bed blockers off the wards as ministers had hoped. Hospitals were better prepared than last year, the organisation said, but shortages of key staff and more demand for their services meant patients would suffer during the busiest periods.

Sun
HOSPITALS are facing their worst winter and will be unable to cope, the Government was warned yesterday. The grim alert was sounded by the trade association that represents them amid staff shortages and mounting pressure on budgets. Only an urgent cash injection of between £200million and £350million will stave off the looming chaos, according to the organisation NHS Providers. The body, which also represents mental health, community and ambulance service trusts in England, warned A&Es face being overwhelmed. Its chief executive Chris Hopson said: “Last winter the health service came under pressure as never before. “At its height, the NHS had to provide 4,500 additional beds a day — equivalent to more than eight extra hospitals.

BBC News
The NHS in England may suffer its worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an emergency bailout, hospital chiefs are warning. They say the cash is needed to pay for extra staff and beds because attempts to improve finances have failed. The government has given councils an extra £1bn for social care services to help relieve the pressure on hospitals. A Department of Health spokeswoman said: “The NHS has prepared for winter more this year than ever before.” But the latest figures show A&E waits and bed shortages remain “stubbornly” bad, according to NHS Providers. The group, which represents NHS chief executives, is calling for between £200m and £350m to be made available immediately.

ITV News
Health chiefs have warned the NHS needs an emergency cash boost of between £200 million and £350 million to cope with the added demands of winter. They warn the NHS could face its worst winter in recent history. NHS Providers, the trade association that represents hospital, mental health, community and ambulance service trusts in England, called for the emergency cash injection to enable the NHS to manage patient safety risk in the winter months. The organisation said failure to make the investment will lead to longer waiting times and will put the safety of patients at risk as local trusts struggle to meet the expected demands. A report found the level of planning and support for this winter is better developed than last year, and emergency care performance has been given greater priority.

Mail
Summer is barely over, but NHS campaigners are already demanding extra cash to cope with what they fear will be a disastrous winter. NHS Providers, a trade association which represents hospital trusts, yesterday called for an emergency cash injection of up to £350million to help the health service get through the winter. Its chief executive, Chris Hopson, said the NHS is facing its worst winter in recent history if it does not receive an immediate cash boost. And he said patients would be put at risk and waiting lists would soar unless action was taken. Mr Hopson said: ‘Last winter the health service came under pressure as never before. At its height, the NHS had to provide 4,500 additional beds a day – equivalent to more than eight extra hospitals.

Telegraph
Oxford University is embroiled in an ethics row after scientists were accused of questionable conduct over a controversial trial of a new vaccine on African babies. Professor Peter Beverley, a former senior academic at the university, complained that scientists planned to test a new tuberculosis vaccine on more than a thousand infants without sharing data suggesting that monkeys given the immunisation had appeared to “die rapidly”. “Certainly here in this experiment there was no evidence whatsoever that this is an effective booster vaccine,” Prof Beverley said. He claimed the information was not given to regulators when an application to do the trial was initially submitted. In the monkey study, five out of six of the animals infected with TB who were given the experimental vaccine had become “very unwell” and had to be put down.  

Mail
More than 450 patients miss out on possible organ transplants each year because families do not know their deceased relative’s wishes. About 6,400 people are on the waiting list for a new organ, and some 1,200 are thought to have died last year awaiting a transplant. Experts say the problem is made worse because people are reluctant to discuss their wishes regarding donation. In England an organ transplant from a dead patient is only carried out with the direct permission of a family member. Surveys show more than 80 per cent of people support organ donation. But on 177 occasions in 2016-17 suitable transplants were cancelled because a relative said they were not sure whether the patient would have agreed, according to statistics published by NHS Blood and Transplant.

Immigration

Mail
Three police officers were injured during clashes with migrants trying to get on board UK-bound lorries struck in traffic jams in Calais. Violence broke out after the French blamed the British for failing to open enough vehicle lanes at the end of the holiday season. Saturday’s disturbances saw at least 60 mainly young men trying to take advantage of the chaos, as officers used tear gas and baton charges to disperse them. Local police chief Jean-Philippe Vennin: ‘Our British colleagues had opened only nine out of fourteen lanes this weekend, even though we expected 9000 vehicles in the Eurotunnel and 7500 at the port.’ When travelling from France to Britain, travellers have to clear both French and British immigration and customs checks.

Rail strike

Mail
Members of the Rail Maritime and Transport (RMT) union will stage a walkout on Southern, Northern and Merseyrail services in a dispute over train guards. Thousands of trains will be cancelled and stations closed, with the RMT also threatening to spread the protest to the South West and Wales. Northern and Southern guards also walked out on Friday while Merseyrail workers took action on Friday and yesterday. But operators complain that today’s action appears designed to cause maximum disruption, with pupils and workers facing long delays and bus-replacement services as they return after summer holidays.

Independent
Rail workers at three train operators are staging fresh strikes on Monday in disputes over the role of guards and driver-only trains which will disrupt travel as people return to work after the holidays and schools reopen. Members of the Rail, Maritime and Transport union (RMT) at Southern, Merseyrail and Arriva Rail North will walk out amid worsening industrial relations in the industry. The Southern dispute started more than 16 months ago, with the RMT taking over 30 days of strike action. The threat of industrial action against the industry’s newest franchise holder is also looming. RMT members on South Western Railway are to be balloted for strikes, just days after the operator took over the running of services from London Waterloo.

Korea

Times
Donald Trump kept open the option of a retaliatory strike against North Korea last night after Pyongyang tested what it said was a hydrogen bomb that could be mounted on an intercontinental missile. He also threatened to sever trade ties with China as the White House wrestled with how to respond to Kim Jong-un’s detonation of a powerful new atomic weapon. Asked if he planned to attack North Korea, Mr Trump said: “We’ll see.” James Mattis, the US defence secretary, said that the “total annihilation” of North Korea was an option, albeit one that Mr Trump was keen to avoid. “We have many military options, and the president wanted to be briefed on each one of them,” Mr Mattis said outside the White House.

Mirror
Donald Trump has called North Korea a ‘rogue nation’ that will ‘only understand one thing’ in a series of tweets posted after the secretive state announced the “perfect success” of a hydrogen bomb test. On Twitter, the US President wrote: “North Korea has conducted a major Nuclear Test. Their words and actions continue to be very hostile and dangerous to the United States… “North Korea is a rogue nation which has become a great threat and embarrassment to China, which is trying to help but with little success. “South Korea is finding, as I have told them, that their talk of appeasement with North Korea will not work, they only understand one thing!” Meanwhile, Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said: “There’s no question that this is another provocation. It’s reckless, what they’re doing.

Independent
Theresa May has called the latest North Korea nuclear weapons tests “reckless and unacceptable”. The Prime Minister said in a statement: “This latest action by North Korea is reckless and poses an unacceptable further threat to the international community. “I discussed the serious and grave threat these dangerous and illegal actions present with President Abe in Japan this week and reiterate the call we jointly made for tougher action, including increasing the pace of implementation of existing sanctions and looking urgently in the UN Security Council at new measures.” “This is now even more pressing. The international community has universally condemned this test and must come together to continue to increase the pressure on North Korea’s leaders to stop their destabilising actions.”

Times
It began with what felt like a medium-sized earthquake, shaking buildings along the Chinese border and in South Korea. The timing, at the strike of noon in North Korea, was peculiarly precise for a natural phenomenon. Three hours later the confirmation came. Ri Chun-hee, North Korea’s veteran newsreader, jubilantly announced a successful nuclear test, its sixth and most powerful by far, with what she described as a thermonuclear warhead — a hydrogen bomb — capable of being fitted to an intercontinental ballistic missile. Foreign seismologists analysing the earthquake estimated that the underground test had a yield of as much as 120 kilotons, eight times larger than the American bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945.

White cliffs of Dover

Telegraph
The vast swathe of countryside above the White Cliffs of Dover could be sold to developers if the National Trust cannot raise £1 million in three weeks to buy one of Britain’s most important landscapes. The Trust currently manages the threatened five miles of the chalk cliffs and in 2012 bought a mile section to protect the area for the nation. But recently it learned that the landowner is planning to sell off the managed area, prompting fears that without intervention the 700,000 square metre expanse of rolling chalk clifftops could be altered forever by developers. Now The Trust has launched an  urgent appeal claiming it would be ‘devastating’ if it lost the chance to protect the site.

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