Boris

Telegraph
Boris Johnson was admitted to hospital on Sunday night after failing to shake off coronavirus after two weeks. Number 10 said that the Prime Minister was taken to hospital by private car for tests after he continued to report a high temperature. Aides insisted that he remained in charge of the Government. The news was unexpected as Downing Street had briefed in the mid-afternoon that there was no change in his condition. Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, said on Sunday morning that while he was “OK”, he was still running a mild temperature. Mr Johnson is understood to be in an NHS hospital in London, where he will stay for “as long as needed”. Previously the Government has indicated that if Mr Johnson was incapacitated, Dominic Raab as First Secretary of State would take temporary charge.

Sun
BORIS Johnson was rushed to hospital last night after failing to shake off his coronavirus symptoms, ten days after testing positive. Downing Street said the Prime Minister had been admitted for tests as a “precautionary step”. He continues to have “persistent symptoms”, thought to be a high temperature. Boris, 55, who was not taken in an ambulance, is understood to be receiving treatment at an undisclosed central London NHS hospital. Aides confirmed he was spending the night there and would remain “as long as necessary”. The move comes after aides became increasingly worried about his health as Mr Johnson continued to show symptoms more than a week after he tested positive. Government aides said Boris had been “coughing and spluttering” on video conference calls over the past few days.

Sky News
Boris Johnson has been admitted to an NHS hospital in central London for tests 10 days after confirming he had contracted coronavirus. The prime minister, 55, still has persistent coronavirus  symptoms and went on the advice of his doctor, Downing Street said. A spokesperson confirmed his admission was a precautionary rather than emergency measure and added he “thanks NHS staff for all of their incredible hard work”. They also urged the public to “continue to follow the government’s advice to stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives”. Sky News understands that Mr Johnson was to remain in hospital overnight. His persistent symptoms are understood to include a high temperature.

Independent
Boris Johnson has been admitted to hospital for tests after experiencing persistent symptoms of coronavirus ten days after testing positive for the virus. Number 10 said on Sunday evening that the prime minister was taken to an NHS London hospital as a “precautionary step” on the advice of his doctor. Mr Johnson has been self-isolating in his Downing Street flat since 27 March when he announced he had contracted Covid-19. It is understood he remains in charge of the government’s efforts to tackle the outbreak of the disease and is in contact with ministerial colleagues and officials. Officials insisted it was not an emergency admission to hospital and was considered “sensible” for doctors to see the prime minister given he still has a high temperature.

Times
Boris Johnson was admitted to hospital for tests last night because of his coronavirus symptoms, Downing Street said. The prime minister was taken there as a “precautionary step” on the advice of his doctor. He tested positive for the virus ten days ago, and had been in self-isolation inside his Downing Street flat since. A No 10 spokeswoman said: “The prime minister has tonight been admitted to hospital for tests. This is a precautionary step, as the prime minister continues to have persistent symptoms of coronavirus ten days after testing positive for the virus. “The prime minister thanks NHS staff for all of their incredible hard work and urges the public to continue to follow the government’s advice to stay at home.

Deaths

Telegraph
Coronavirus deaths in Britain continue to mount. The sun is shining, the NHS has dramatically expanded its critical care capacity – but hundreds of deaths are still being reported each day.  The latest official figures show 4,934 Covid-19 deaths in Britain as of 5pm on Saturday, up 621 from Friday. The total number of deaths reported over the last week has climbed sharply, reflecting the early exponential spread of the virus across the country. It’s a reminder that the terrible toll of the disease – while not as visible on our television screens as it has been in Italy, Spain and now America – is still very much with us and claiming many lives, old and young. Warnings we would follow the same trajectory as Italy have unfortunately come to pass with reported UK deaths tracking Italy’s at a 14 to 15 day time lag. Thankfully, Italy is now reporting fewer deaths each day, suggesting the lockdown there has stifled the rate of new infections and, for the moment at least, brought the epidemic there under control.

Sun
BRITAIN’S coronavirus death toll has risen to 4,974 today after 621 more people died. A total of 47,806 across the UK have now tested positive for coronavirus after 5,903 more people were infected.  Fewer deaths were announced today than the 708 yesterday or the 684 on Friday. But the number of new daily infections jumped – as 5,903 more people tested positive in the past 24 hours, compared to 3,735 yesterday. A 35-year-old was among 29 patients with no underlying health conditions to have died. In England, the death toll rose to 4,494 after 555 more people died. NHS England said the patients were between the ages of 33 and 103 years old. While in Northern Ireland, there have been a further seven deaths – bringing the total to 63. Wales has reported 12 more deaths – with their total now at 166. In Scotland, a further two people have died – bringing the total number of deaths to 220.

Mail
Britain’s death toll from the coronavirus could overtake both Italy and France, a worrying new graphic has revealed. The number of deaths in the UK rose by 621 to 4,934 today, including 29 patients who did not have any underlying health conditions. Now, the UK is just behind where Italy and France were 20 days after registering 50 deaths from the outbreak.  However, both those countries’ started to see their death rates decrease after this point, while the UK is expected to not peak for another week to 10 days. This means Britain’s deaths could dwarf both countries, though this isn’t guaranteed.   The people who died of the illness today were aged between 33 and 103, with 29 of them, aged between 35 and 95, having no known underlying health conditions. The level of infections has risen sharply by almost 60 per cent, from 5,903 to 47,806, dashing hopes the rate of people getting the disease was starting to level out.

Scotland CMO

Independent
Scotland‘s chief medical officer has resigned from the government after breaking coronavirus lockdown rules by visiting her second home. Dr Catherine Calderwood agreed to step down just hours after “unreservedly” apologising for the trip to Fife and withdrawing from giving public briefings. She said that she took the decision following a discussion with first minister Nicola Sturgeon, who said that the issue “risks undermining confidence” in the government’s advice. “I am deeply sorry for my actions and the mistakes I have made,” Dr Calderwood said in a statement. “The first minister and I have had a further conversation this evening and we have agreed that the justifiable focus on my behaviour risks becoming a distraction from the hugely important job that government and the medical profession has to do in getting the country through this coronavirus pandemic.

Guardian
Scotland’s chief medical officer, Catherine Calderwood, has quit after facing intense criticism for breaking her own rules to twice visit her second home during the coronavirus outbreak. In a statement issued on Sunday night, more than seven hours after insisting she would carry on, Calderwood said she had again discussed the controversy with Scottish first minister Nicola Sturgeon and concluded her position was untenable. She said she realised it was impossible for the public to have confidence in official advice to avoid all essential travel if she remained in post: “People across Scotland know what they need to do to reduce the spread of this virus and that means they must have complete trust in those who give them advice. It is with a heavy heart that I resign as chief medical officer.”

Express
SCOTLAND’S Chief Medical Officer resigned on Sunday after she flouted her own advice to stay at home to fight the spread of the coronavirus by travelling to her second home on two successive weekends. Catherine Calderwood said the justifiable focus on her behaviour risked becoming a distraction from the hugely important job that government and the medical profession had to do in getting the country through this coronavirus pandemic. In her statement, Dr Calderwood said: “I am deeply sorry for my actions and the mistakes I have made. “The First Minister and I have had a further conversation this evening and we have agreed that the justifiable focus on my behaviour risks becoming a distraction from the hugely important job that government and the medical profession has to do in getting the country through this coronavirus pandemic.

Lockdown exit strategy

Telegraph
The first hint of what Britain’s exit strategy from lockdown will be has been revealed by one of the Government’s top advisors. Prof Neil Ferguson, whose team at Imperial College London has been so crucial to driving the current strategy that he has been dubbed ‘Professor Lockdown’, said that mass testing and contact tracing would “almost certainly” replace current restrictions once numbers had fallen substantially. Prof Ferguson told the BBC’s Andrew Marr programme that hospital admissions were now decreasing on a daily basis, and said he hoped that the epidemic would plateau within the next seven to 10 days. The number of daily deaths also fell over the weekend from 708 deaths reported on Saturday to 621 on Sunday, and Prof Ferguson said that overall deaths may end up being as low as 7,000.

Times
Ministers have begun discussions about how and when they might be able to ease the coronavirus lockdown amid Treasury fears about the long-term economic fallout of the measures. A team is understood to be drawing up a list of options to remove some restrictions as and when the number of new hospital admissions begin to fall. It comes after Treasury officials warned that if the lockdown lasted much beyond June then there would come a point when the government would no longer be able to prevent otherwise profitable industries from going to the wall.

Mail
Italy has announced plans for ending its lockdown after the coronavirus-ravaged country today recorded its lowest daily death toll for more than two weeks.   Rome recorded another 525 deaths, taking its total to 15,887 – the highest of any country in the world – however, this marked its lowest daily increase since the 427 registered on March 19. Furthermore, the number of people in intensive care (3,977), fell by 17 since Friday, and the number of cases rose to 128,948 from yesterday’s 124,632, a lower increase than the day before. It comes amid growing signs that Spain’s strict coronavirus lockdown may be working, as the country records its lowest death toll for a third consecutive day.  The country recorded 674 deaths down from 809 the day before.  And in France, the number of coronavirus deaths slowed for a second day running as the nation recorded 357 fatalities – its lowest daily death rate in a week.

Antibodies

Star
Scientists have identified a coronavirus “Achilles’ heel” that may pave the way for a vaccine. Researchers at Scripps Research have studied an antibody in a SARS patient to see how it latched on to an area of the virus. They claim this antibody latched on to the same spot on a coronavirus sample with “near-atomic-scale resolution”. Although it was not as effective on the coronavirus sample, it did identify a weakness. Dr Ian Wilson, the study’s lead author, said: “The knowledge of conserved sites like this can aid in structure-based design of vaccines and therapeutics against SARS-CoV-2, and these would also protect against other coronaviruses – including those that may emerge in the future.”

Times
None of the antibody tests ordered by the government is good enough to use, the new testing chief has admitted. Professor John Newton said that tests ordered from China were able to identify immunity accurately only in people who had been severely ill and that Britain was no longer hoping to buy millions of kits off the shelf. Instead, government scientists hope to work with companies to improve the performance of antibody tests and Professor Newton said he was “optimistic” that one would come good in months.

Illegal immigration

Breitbart
Dozens of illegal migrants reached Britain’s shores over the weekend after being brought to Dover by the Border Force after being intercepted in the English Channel, despite coronavirus outbreaks at migrant camps in France. On Saturday, Border Force stopped four boats filled with 53 migrants from Iraq, Iran, Syria, Kuwait, and Yemen — but, instead of escorting them back to France, simply brought them to Dover to undergo medical checks before being handed over to immigration officials. The crossing comes just days after another group of 52 Iraqis, Iranians, and Afghans were brought ashore on Thursday. Coronavirus cases have been confirmed an illegal migrant camps in Calais and Dunkirk — common launchpads for people seeking to break into Britain. There are believed to be around 3,000 migrants living in close quarters in such camps in northern France.

China

Times
Options to sue the Chinese government over its initial response to the coronavirus outbreak have been set out in a paper by a neo-conservative think tank. Beijing, if found in breach of any of a series of international treaties, could be liable for compensation running to trillions of dollars, according to the Henry Jackson Society (HJS). The UK alone would have a potential claim for £351 billion from the Chinese state which the think tank says failed to be sufficiently transparent or to contain the outbreak soon enough. It says the failures breach at least two clauses of the International Health Regulations to which China is a signatory.

Sun
LIES about coronavirus by China are costing lives and hindering the fight against the disease, MPs have said. The Commons Foreign Affairs Committee said China should have had a central role in collecting data on spread after the outbreak. But it added that Beijing had sought to “obfuscate” over what was really happening right from the outset. It also named Iran and Russia as being responsible for disseminating false information about the virus. Committee chairman Tom Tugendhat said Beijing had initially “allowed disinformation to spread as quickly as the virus”. He added: “Rather than helping other countries prepare a swift and strong response, it is increasingly apparent that they manipulated vital information about the virus in order to protect the regime’s image.

Independent
China’s efforts to downplay the coronavirus pandemic in its earliest stages and subsequent disinformation campaign surrounding the disease has cost lives and is hindering the international effort to contain it, MPs in Westminster have warned. A new report by the Commons Foreign Affairs Committee argues the country where the outbreak began should have taken a leading role in collecting data and sharing its research with other nations to help control the spread of Covid-19, accusing Xi Jinping’s Beijing of engaging in “obfuscation” rather than transparency. The report also accuses Russia and Iran of refusing to come clean about their experiences of the global catastrophe and calls on the British government to “confront and rebut” untruths from foreign powers.

EU

Telegraph
The oil price crash and economic carnage triggered by the coronavirus is set to cause record deflation in the eurozone, reviving fears of the region sliding into so-called Japanification. Economists have warned that the eurozone will be tipped into the feared territory next month as a period of benign inflation is ended by a slump in demand. Capital Economics predicted that inflation would sink to a record low of -1pc in the summer and price falls would stoke tensions at the European Central Bank (ECB). Morgan Stanley said it expected prices to turn negative as soon as next month and remain in deflation territory until August.

5G

Times
More UK phone masts have been attacked following a series of arson incidents linked to false claims that 5G communications technology is linked to the spread of the coronavirus outbreak. In the last 24 hours there have been four attacks on Vodafone’s mobile network, bringing the total number of incidents across the country including arson, attempted arson, criminal damage and vandalism to 20. Last week blazes were reported at masts at Sparkhill in Birmingham, north Belfast, Atherton in Greater Manchester and Aintree in Liverpool.

Sun
ARSONISTS have torched more 5G phone masts following bizarre fake news that the technology is linked to coronavirus. As reported exclusively on The Sun Online earlier this week, conspiracy theorists have been setting blazes and targeting engineers over ridiculous claims 5G radiation caused Covid-19 to spread. The theory originated last month after a video filmed at a US health conference claimed Africa was not as affected by the disease because it is “not a 5G region”. Vandals then set masts in Birmingham, Liverpool and Merseyside on fire. Now a spokesperson from Vodafone says there have been four further incidents at their sites, as well as a site shared with 02.

Independent
Michael Gove has branded conspiracy theories on social media blaming new 5G masts for the spread of coronavirus as “dangerous nonsense” while the national medical director of the NHS said it was the “worst kind of fake news”. The strong criticism from officials comes after celebrities were accused of “fanning the flames” of the baseless stories linking the technology to the outbreak of Covid-19. Videos purportedly showing telephone masts on fire have also circulated online. Condemning the theories on Saturday at a No 10 press conference, Mr Gove, the minister for the cabinet office, said: “That’s just nonsense. Dangerous nonsense as well.” Appearing alongside the cabinet minister, the national medical director of NHS England Professor Stephen Powis also said: “I’m absolutely outraged, absolutely disgusted, that people would be taking action against the very infrastructure that we need to respond to this health emergency.”

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