WTO rules

Sun
THE chances of a no-deal Brexit are looking increasingly likely after the EU threw out Theresa May’s compromise proposals on Northern Ireland. Some have warned of chaos if we crash out without an agreement – but just what does a no deal mean for the UK? A no-deal British departure from the European Union means leaving without formal arrangements for the future relationship. Currently Britain’s trade, customs and immigration rules are tied up with the single market and a host of EU regulatory bodies. Ministers are seeking a legal deal to replace these with looser arrangements so we are outside the single market and customs union but keeping close ties so cross-border trade is easy. Negotiations are ongoing under Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty ahead of the UK’s exit on March 29, 2019. Some fear these talks could collapse without a deal agreed before the deadline. This could mean the UK being treated as a “third country” by the EU with commerce governed by World Trade Organisation rules.

Brexit

Telegraph
Theresa May will be warned by senior Eurosceptic Cabinet ministers that leaving the EU without a deal will be better than giving in to Brussels’ demands on Brexit. Dominic Raab, the Brexit Secretary, and leading Eurosceptics including Andrea Leadsom and Liam Fox are expected to use a Cabinet meeting on Tuesday to warn the Prime Minister that the EU’s demands are “totally unacceptable”. On Monday night they were due to meet for eve-of-Cabinet drinks at Dr Fox’s office to discuss concerns that Brussels is refusing to back down over the issue of a customs “backstop” with the EU.

Sun
BREXIT-BACKING Cabinet ministers have vowed to force Theresa May into taking a tough stand on the EU amid fears she will sell out Leave voters. International Development Secretary Penny Mordaunt promised to be a “check” on the PM as she cuts a deal with Brussels. She said the Cabinet will only sign off on an agreement if it “delivers on the referendum result”. Ms Mordaunt is among four senior ministers who have threatened to quit if Mrs May refuses to enact a clean break with the EU.

Sun
THERESA May turned down a Brexit deal fudge with the EU because she fears Parliament would shoot it down, it has emerged. British and EU negotiators talked until 2.45am on Monday morning in a desperate bid to break deadlock over the Irish border backstop and hit tomorrow’s deadline. Brussels’ talks chief Michel Barnier yesterday claimed a deal was imminent by declaring that “the parameters are very largely defined”. But it has emerged that the PM refused to accept the deal’s latest draft because it still didn’t give the UK a clear escape from a custom union if the EU started acting in bad faith on talks about a future trade deal.

Times
Theresa May publicly rebuked Brussels last night for forcing the pace of a divorce deal as negotiators worked frantically to conclude an agreement by tomorrow. Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, angered Downing Street by claiming that today’s meeting of Mrs May’s cabinet would be shown the parameters of an agreement. In fact talks are still stuck on Britain’s demand for an exit mechanism from the so-called temporary customs union — the backstop under which it would remain aligned to EU rules to prevent a hard border in Ireland.

Express
THERESA May last night dramatically warned Brussels that Britain will not accept a Brexit deal “at any cost”. In a curt riposte to claims from the EU that the two sides were nearing agreement, the Prime Minister insisted she will not buckle as the negotiations reach their final phase. She also signalled her readiness to walk away from the talks unless the deal returns control of laws, borders and money to the UK. “I will not compromise on what people voted for in the referendum. This will not be an agreement at any cost,” she said.

Mail
Theresa May has warned that she will not sign up to a Brexit agreement ‘at any cost’ as she said ‘significant’ issues continue to block the path to a deal with Brussels. The Prime Minister used a speech to City grandees in London to say she ‘will not compromise’ on what people had voted for in the 2016 referendum, telling them Britons ‘overwhelmingly’ wanted her to ‘get on’ with leaving the EU. Her comments in an address to the annual Lord Mayor’s Banquet seemed to extinguish hopes that the Cabinet might sign off a deal when it meets on Tuesday.

ITV News
Theresa May has warned that she will not sign up to a Brexit “agreement at any cost” as she said “significant” issues continue to block the path to a deal with Brussels. The Prime Minister used a speech to City grandees in London to say she “will not compromise” on what people had voted for in the 2016 referendum, telling them Britons “overwhelmingly” wanted her to “get on” with leaving the EU. Her comments in an address to the annual Lord Mayor’s Banquet seemed to extinguish hopes that the Cabinet might sign off a deal when it meets on Tuesday.

Independent
Hopes are fading for an emergency summit to agree a Brexit deal this month as Downing Street admitted “substantial issues” are still to be overcome between London and Brussels. Senior British officials were locked in talks until 2.45am with their EU counterparts but failed to produce a decisive breakthrough on the remaining problems, including the vexed issue of the Irish border. The absence of progress has plunged Theresa May‘s plans into chaos, as she had hoped to reach an agreement with the EU by Wednesday – the deadline for arranging an emergency EU summit in November.

Sky News
Brexit negotiations with Brussels are now “in the endgame”, Theresa May has declared, amid predictions that a deal could be imminent. The prime minister said talks between UK and European negotiators have been going on through the night in a bid to break the Brexit deadlock. And, with Brexiteers in her cabinet and on the Tory backbenches threatening mutiny, the PM also promised no compromise on the 2016 referendum result or agreement at any cost.

BBC News
Negotiations over the UK’s departure from the EU are “now in the endgame”, Theresa May has said. Addressing the Lord Mayor’s Banquet in the City of London, the prime minister said talks were “immensely difficult”, but the sides would work “through the night” to make progress. Mrs May will address her cabinet on Tuesday, with some ministers believed to want a change of plan. 
The main sticking point is how to keep trade flowing at the Irish border.

Mirror
Brexit talks are in their “endgame”, Theresa May declared tonight as the deadline for striking a deal creeps closer. “Immensely difficult” negotiations were running through the night as teams from the UK and EU battle to thrash out a backstop for the Northern Ireland border, the Prime Minister told the Lord Mayor’s Banquet in London. The Cabinet meets in No 10 this morning but it is understood a potential pact will not be ready to be shown to ministers. Mrs May told tonight’s glitzy bash in the City: “The negotiations for our departure are now in the endgame, and we are working extremely hard, through the night, to make progress on the remaining issues in the Withdrawal Agreement, which are significant.

Guardian
Theresa May’s efforts to secure a Brexit deal by the end of March have suffered a serious setback after it emerged that UK and European Union negotiators were struggling to bridge the gap over the Irish border backstop in time for a November summit. The prime minister was forced to admit that “significant” issues remained despite talks that went on until the early hours of Monday morning. Unless there is dramatic progress by the end of Wednesday, the exit timetable will become increasingly squeezed.

Legal advice

Express
LABOUR will seek to force Theresa May to release the Government’s legal advice on the Irish border backstop tomorrow as hopes of a Brexit breakthrough fade. Jeremy Corbyn’s party will use an arcane procedure known as a “humble address” during an opposition day debate in an attempt to make guidance by Attorney General Geoffrey Cox available to MPs once a Brexit deal is ready to be put before the Commons. The procedure, which seeks to make a Commons vote binding on the Government by presenting a motion asking the Queen to require ministers to comply, was used last year to force the publication of Brexit impact assessments.

Reuters
The Labour Party said it would try to force the government in a special vote on Tuesday to publish its legal advice on leaving the European Union, including on how the deal will handle the sensitive issue of the Irish border. Conservative Prime Minister Theresa May is trying to reach agreement with Brussels to end Britain’s four-decade relationship with the European Union. With opposition from within her own ranks as well as across parliament there is no certainty that any deal will be reached.

Sun
DOZENS of Tory MPs will today rebel against Theresa May to force her to publish the full legal advice about any Brexit deal. The hardline Brexiteer European Research Group tabled their own Commons bid late last night to supersede an attempt by Labour to defeat the Government.  Jeremy Corbyn’s party earlier pledged to use an ancient Parliamentary procedure, known as a humble address, to exact the promise from the Government. The PM has angered Cabinet ministers by only offering them a summary of Attorney General Geoffrey Cox’s legal verdict on any final exit deal.

Guardian
Labour will launch an attempt to force ministers to publish the government’s legal advice on Theresa May’s Irish backstop plan before any Brexit deal is put before parliament. The shadow Brexit secretary, Keir Starmer, will on Tuesday use the humble address – an ancient procedure used by the party last year to force the release of Brexit impact assessments – to demand the government produce the backstop papers for scrutiny. He said the party would be using its opposition day debate to stage a vote on the motion as it would be untenable to keep MPs “in the dark” on the legal advice before asking them to vote on the prime minister’s Brexit plan.

Lawyers for Britain
Many people are demanding to see the legal advice which the Attorney General gives to the Cabinet about the Irish border “backstop” arrangement. But much more important than seeing the Attorney’s advice is seeing
the actual legal text of the deal being negotiated in secret between the UK government and the EU. There is no valid diplomatic reason for keeping the text secret, since it is known to the other side in the negotiations. I fear that the real reason for this secrecy is to limit the ability of Parliamentarians, lawyers, experts and others to study the details of what is being agreed behind closed doors, and to identify problems and other issues which arise from the detailed provisions of the legal text which may not be apparent from what is in the public domain. Although important additional issues may arise from the legal text, enough is publicly known about the shape of the “backstop” deal for clear legal advice to be given on the salient points. So this is the advice I would give the Cabinet.

Fisheries

Sun
MICHEL Barnier is fighting a rebellion from furious EU countries who fear he is about to sell them out and grant Britain a vital reprieve on fishing. Capitals have been infuriated by the Commission’s “weak” plan to link access to our waters to a UK-wide backstop. Under a top secret blueprint being drawn up by both sides Britain could avoid letting EU vessels land catches simply by accepting tariffs on our fish. A diplomatic note, seen by The Sun, reveals angry Member States confronted Mr Barnier about the proposal at a meeting last Friday.

Border force

Telegraph
Britain’s borders have been left open to illegal immigrants because of chronic staff shortages at ports, the chief inspector of borders and immigration has revealed. David Bolt was told by Border Force officers it was “resourced to fail” with borders “not secured by any stretch of the imagination” due to the shortages at Dover, Portsmouth, Southampton and Poole. Officers at Portsmouth and Poole told his team of inspectors that they were “not remotely confident” they were preventing attempts by illegal immigrants to sneak into Britain.

Times
Illegal migrants have better intelligence than Border Force officers as they adopt tactics to exploit understaffed checkpoints and ports, a watchdog warned yesterday. Officers at one south coast port admitted that the border was “not secured by any stretch of the imagination” in a report highlighting how understaffing is thwarting efforts to detect illegals entering the UK. The report by the chief inspector of borders and immigration also shows how tougher security measures at Calais and Dover have led migrants to move to other ports in France and Spain to try to reach Britain.

EU

Westmonster
France’s Finance Minister has once again revealed the deep-held desire for a United States of Europe among large chunks of the EU establishment, demanding that the European Union becomes an “empire”. In an interview with German newspaper Handelsblatt, Bruno Le Maire pushes for the Germans to work with President Macron in ensuring a raft of measures go forward, including a Eurozone budget. He also backs the EU Commission’s blocking of Italy’s national budget.

Telegraph
France has launched a feverish campaign to shore up the euro before the next global downturn, warning that monetary union is not strong enough to withstand another crisis and faces disintegration without fiscal union. Bruno Le Maire, the French finance minister, said there are just weeks left for Germany and the Dutch-led “Hanseatic League” to grasp the nettle on long-delayed reforms. “Either we get a eurozone budget or there will eventually be no euro at all,” he said.

Independent
EU member states have warned that a Brexit deal hinges on agreement in Theresa May’s cabinet, as they gathered in Brussels on Monday to be updated on the latest news in talks. Belgian foreign minister Didier Reynders told reporters outside the council meeting the EU was “waiting for new news from London”, adding: “We have time, but not so much.” France’s EU affairs minister, Nathalie Loiseau echoed the sentiment, telling reporters on the way into the gathering: “The ball is in the British court. It is a question of a British political decision.”

Tommy Robinson

Reuters
British far-right activist Tommy Robinson has not been granted a U.S. visa to meet with Republican lawmakers in Washington this week, an organizer of the meeting said on Monday. Robinson is the founder of the English Defence League, or EDL, which in the past has staged violent demonstrations against Islam. He was jailed by British authorities in 2013 for using a passport in someone else’s name to travel to the United States from Britain.

Education

Times
A proposed across-the-board cut in tuition fees to £6,500 in England would benefit wealthy graduates most and could close opportunities for students from the poorest backgrounds, university chiefs have argued. Dame Janet Beer, president of Universities UK, which represents vice-chancellors, said that less money at universities would result in fewer grants for poorer students. Graduates who went on to well paid jobs would be the big winners, she said.

Sun
SLASHING university tuition fees from £9,250 to £6,500 would hit the poorest students hardest and benefit the highest earners, uni chiefs insisted yesterday. 
Dame Janet Beer, president of Universities UK, said a cut in fees would mean institutions would be forced to limit places and mean graduates on the highest incomes paid less back. It comes amid fevered speculation of a fees shake up ahead of publication of a review into higher education funding in England.

Morning Star
UNIVERSITY tuition fees were introduced by a New Labour government and then trebled by the Tory and Liberal Democrat coalition, making an unjust policy even worse. The educational crisis of students leaving their degree courses with debts of £50,000 or more was caused by government. It can be repaired by government. 
Apart from all but wiping out the Liberal Democrats in Parliament, including their deceitful leader Nick Clegg, tuition fees — effectively a tax on aspiration — have become a financial albatross around the necks of postgraduates.

NHS

Times
NHS Digital has ended an agreement to share patients’ details with the Home Office to track down illegal migrants. Doctors, health charities and MPs had warned that the scheme was deterring some patients from seeking care. Ministers suspended the arrangement six months ago but allowed the Home Office to use data to trace people being considered for deportation for committing serious crimes. Facing a legal challenge from the charity Migrants’ Rights Network, NHS Digital has said that it will completely withdraw from the deal.

Huffington Post
The NHS has pulled out of a controversial data-sharing arrangement with the Home Office which saw confidential patients’ details passed on to immigration enforcers. In May, the government suspended the ‘memorandum of understanding’ agreement between the health service and the Home Office after MPs, doctors and health charities warned it was leaving seriously ill migrants too afraid to seek medical treatment. But on Tuesday, NHS Digital announced that it was cutting itself out of the agreement altogether.

Mail
Paramedics will be given self-defence lessons because over-stretched police no longer respond quickly enough to their calls for help. South Western Ambulance Service staff will be given the training after its boss revealed assistance from police has been ‘reduced’. Restraint training, known as safer holding training, has already been given to five per cent of staff at the service and will be rolled out to the rest over the next two years.

UFOs

Mail
A UFO investigation is under way in Ireland after pilots flying BA and Virgin Airlines jets reported seeing mysterious bright lights as they crossed the country. The Irish Aviation Authority launched the probe after sightings on November 9 at around 7.40am. The pilot of British Airways flight BA94 from Montreal to London contacted Shannon Air Traffic Control after seeing the object on the left-hand side of her Boeing 787. She asked whether military exercises were taking place, according to Airlive. Air traffic control reportedly said nothing was showing on their radar systems, to which the unnamed pilot replied: ‘OK. It was moving so fast.’

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