Bercow

Telegraph
John Bercow said on Tuesday that he would refuse to let Boris Johnson take Britain out of the EU by suspending Parliament. The Commons Speaker said he would fight any attempt to prorogue Parliament “with every bone in my body”. He also said that MPs can stop Britain leaving without a deal at the end of October, putting him on a collision course with the Prime Minister’s chief strategist, Dominic Cummings. Mr Bercow dismissed suggestions that he would stand down in the short term as Speaker. His first comments since Mr Johnson became Prime Minister last month set the scene for a constitutional battle this autumn in which Mr Johnson could find himself trying to take the UK out of the EU without a deal against the wishes of MPs.

Times
The Commons Speaker has insisted that parliament can block a no-deal Brexit as he vowed to “fight with every breath” to stop MPs being bypassed by Boris Johnson. John Bercow is viewed by MPs determined to stop a no-deal Brexit as a crucial figure who could help them to use parliamentary procedure to engineer a crunch vote. At the end of an hour-long event at the Edinburgh Fringe yesterday entitled Speaking Out: a Conversation with John Bercow, an audience member shouted from the floor to ask whether parliament could stop a no-deal Brexit. Mr Bercow replied “Yes”, before leaving the stage.

Express
JOHN BERCOW, the Speaker of the House of Commons, has told an event he would refuse to allow Boris Johnson to prorogue Parliament to force through a no deal Brexit. The suspension of Parliament was originally suggested by now Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab in the Tory leadership contest. Speaking in Edinburgh’s New Town, Mr Bercow insisted he would not allow such an action to be taken. The Daily Telegraph reported he told the 200-strong audience: “The one thing I feel strongly about is that the House of Commons must have its way.

Independent
Britain is in “deep trouble” unless Boris Johnson and Jeremy Corbyn can act like “good chaps” and find a way to resolve the Brexit crisis, a leading constitutional expert has warned. In a boost for pro-EU campaigners, a Court of Session judge has ruled that a legal challenge seeking to prevent Mr Johnson from suspending parliament to force through a no-deal exit will be heard before 31 October.

Mirror
JOHN Bercow last night vowed he would refuse to let Boris Johnson take Britain out of the EU by suspending Parliament. The Commons Speaker said he would fight any attempt to prorogue Parliament with “every bone in my body”. Mr Johnson’s chief strategist Dominic Cummings has suggested the Prime Minister could call a general election after October 31, even if he lost a no-confidence motion, allowing for a no-deal Brexit whilst Parliament is dissolved. But is not clear how the Speaker would attempt to stop a no-deal.

Sky News
John Bercow has said he will fight “with every bone in my body” any attempts by Boris Johnson to shut parliament to force through a no-deal Brexit. The Commons Speaker said “nobody is going to get away as far as I am concerned” with stopping MPs taking action to avoid the scenario, according to The Daily Telegraph. In his first public comments since the new prime minister won the keys to Number 10, the paper said Mr Bercow also went one step further and claimed the Commons could stop Britain leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreement on 31 October.

Mail
John Bercow has insisted he will fight with ‘every breath’ to halt any attempts to suspend parliament in the run-up to Brexit. The Speaker of the House of Commons yesterday insisted that not even the Prime Minister would ‘get away’ with attempting to prorogue parliament. And he vowed to personally challenge Boris Johnson if he made any attempt to push through a no-deal Brexit.  Mr Johnson has so far refused to rule out proroguing parliament in a bid to force through a no-deal Brexit – meaning MPs would be prevented from blocking a chaotic exit from the EU.

Evening Standard
John Bercow has insisted he will “fight with every breath” to prevent Boris Johnson from suspending parliament to force through a no-deal Brexit. The House of Commons Speaker’s remarks amounted to his strongest signal yet that he is prepared to personally intervene to stop prorogation. Mr Bercow said he “strongly believes” the Commons “must have its way” and that MPs must continue to sit and debate the issue as the Halloween deadline looms.

Westmonster
The Speaker John Bercow has vowed to “fight” in a bid to stop the Prime Minister shutting down Parliament to deliver a clean break WTO Brexit. Speaking at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, he has said: “The one thing I feel strongly about is that the House of Commons must have its way. And if there is an attempt to circumvent, to bypass or – God forbid – to close down Parliament, that is anathema to me.” Bercow also added that: “I will fight with every breath in my body to stop that happening.

No deal

Times
Boris Johnson risks betraying the EU referendum result by allowing “unelected people” intent on wrecking any chance of a deal to “pull the strings” of his government, Philip Hammond is warning. In his first intervention since resigning as chancellor, Mr Hammond accuses Dominic Cummings, Mr Johnson’s most senior aide, of attempting to force through a no-deal Brexit by making demands that Brussels “cannot, and will not, accede to”.

BBC News
Former Chancellor Philip Hammond has accused the PM of trying to wreck the chance of a new Brexit deal, by making demands the EU could never accept. In a Times article, Mr Hammond said a no-deal Brexit would be “a betrayal” of the 2016 referendum result. He said Parliament would “make its voice heard”, adding that a no deal “must not happen”. A No 10 source said the UK would leave on 31 October despite Mr Hammond’s “best efforts to the contrary”.

Guardian
Boris Johnson has been warned by Philip Hammond that leaving the EU without a deal would be a betrayal of the referendum result, as the former chancellor led a group of 20 Conservatives making clear their opposition to crashing out on 31 October. In a sign that some Tory MPs are determined to block a no-deal Brexit, Hammond appeared to blame Dominic Cummings, Johnson’s senior adviser, for making demands for a new deal that the EU “cannot and will not accede to”.

Huffington Post
Boris Johnson would commit a “betrayal” of the 2016 referendum if he delivered a no-deal Brexit by listening to the “unelected” advisers “who pull the strings” of his government, former chancellor Philip Hammond has argued. The former chancellor shattered the Tory party truce that emerged after Johnson became prime minister, urging him to commit to a “genuine negotiation with the EU”. Hammond, who is leading a band of 20 rebel Tory MPs, argues Johnson’s call for the EU to remove the Irish border backstop plan is “a bar so high that there is no realistic probability of a deal being done”.

Express
REMAINER Tory rebels have admitted defeat on plans to defy the will of the people after they conceded their plot to overthrow Brexit is “over”. Europhile politicians intent on bringing down a no deal Brexit have admitted defeat after the Institute for Government warned “time is running out” for MPs trying to block the UK’s exit. Officials said “simply voting against” a no deal could not stop Prime Minister Boris Johnson taking the UK out of the EU by October 31 with or without a deal. A Tory MP told The Times: “I have to admit it. It’s over. I don’t want to be part of it at all.”

Trump

Westmonster
Donald Trump is planning to meet Boris Johnson before he meets any other European leader to “send a signal” about Brexit, report claims. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s national security adviser, praised relations between Britain and the US on Monday, saying they are “on course for an unprecedented partnership”. Bolton also praised the chemistry between Johnson and Trump. “They’ve already had five or six phone calls,” he said. “It’s off to a roaring start.” The G7 summit, which starts on August 24, will also be attended by Angela Merkel, the German chancellor and Giuseppe Conte, the Italian premier. Justin Trudeau, the Canadian prime minister, and Shinzo Abe, the Japanese prime minister, are also expected to attend.

Sun
DONALD Trump is planning to meet Boris Johnson first at the G7 summit to “send a signal” to other European leaders about Brexit, reports claim. The two leaders are off to a “roaring start” and have already had five or six phone calls, according to Trump’s national security adviser John Bolton. Mr Bolton hailed relations between Britain and the US on Monday, saying they are “on course for an unprecedented partnership”. The US said it would be ready to carry out fast-track sector deals immediately after Britain leaves the European Union.

Times
Donald Trump is preparing to meet Boris Johnson before seeing any other European leaders to “send a signal” to them at the G7 summit in France next week. The US has said it is prepared to work immediately on sector-by sector trade agreements after Britain leaves the European Union. John Bolton, Mr Trump’s national security adviser, said on Monday that the chemistry between Mr Johnson and Mr Trump was already better than that between the president and Theresa May.

Labour Party

Times
Jeremy Corbyn must work with the Liberal Democrats to stop a no-deal Brexit, his deputy has warned. Tom Watson, speaking alongside Jo Swinson, the Liberal Democrat leader, at an event hosted by young campaigners for staying in the EU, said that party allegiances needed to be set aside to obstruct Boris Johnson’s Brexit plans. “Everyone who cares about democracy, our country and our future must work together because there are enough of us — from all parties in parliament — to stop him,” he said.

Independent
Jeremy Corbyn is under pressure to back cancelling Brexit  altogether if it is the only way to stop the UK crashing out of the EU, as another battle with Labour activists looms. Almost 30 local parties are demanding Labour “support revoking Article 50 if necessary to prevent no deal”, in motions being submitted to its conference in September. The move threatens to shatter the fragile peace over Brexit policy since the shadow cabinet agreed Labour would campaign for Remain in any fresh referendum held while the Conservatives are in power.

EU

Express
JEAN-CLAUDE Juncker’s replacement Ursula von der Leyen has been sensationally rejected in a shock German poll just weeks before taking the top job in Brussels. Less than half of those surveyed in the poll in Germany, the EU’s top financial provider, said they approved of Ms Von der Leyen, despite the bloc having already crowned her Mr Juncker’s successor. Woman’s lifestyle publication Neue Post asked their readers for their thoughts on an array of female politicians.

Guido
The Prime Minister had a busy afternoon speaking with a host of world leaders yesterday, including two key European players. Upon becoming Prime Minister, Boris announced a commitment to unilaterally guarantee the rights of EU citizens currently living in the UK. May belatedly made the same pledge after years of facing accusations of using citizens as bargaining chips. It’s worth remembering that she was the only leadership candidate back in 2016 not to have made a unilateral pledge on the matter…. Now the supposedly benevolent EU that is refusing to make any kind of declaration on UK citizens living in its countries. But Boris’ unilateral gesture seems to be paying dividends.

Education

Telegraph
English A-level is set for its biggest drop in students in 20 years as headteachers call for an inquiry into whether GCSE reforms are killing the subject. The number of students taking the subject has plummeted by 13 per cent since last year, according to provisional data published by the exams watchdog Ofqual. Geoff Barton, general secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders, described it as “alarming” and urged ministers to take “urgent action”.

Guardian
School-leavers’ anxious wait for university places in England could be ended under proposals by Labour that would delay the admissions process until after exam results are published, ending controversial practices that penalise disadvantaged students. Angela Rayner, Labour’s shadow education secretary, said the next Labour government would undertake an overhaul of the structure and timing of the higher education admissions system in England, to avoid relying on inaccurate A-level grade forecasts and to halt the controversial use of unconditional offers for school-leavers.

ITV News
Giving students university places based on predicted grades is “deeply unfair”, with some of the most “disadvantaged” students missing out on higher education, Labour says. Ahead of A-level results day on Thursday, Labour is calling for “radical action” on higher education admissions, saying they will scrap university offers based on predicted grades and implement a new “fairer” system of post-qualification admissions (PQA). Under Labour’s plans, students will apply for their university or higher education place only after receiving their A-level results or other qualifications, instead of relying on predicted grades which, the party says, unfairly penalises disadvantaged students and those from minority backgrounds.

Times
Students would apply to university only after receiving their A-level results under Labour proposals. The party said that it would abolish the system of predicted A-level grades determining university offers and end the summer clearing scramble. The move would also end unconditional offers, in which universities offer places to students with no A-level grades required. Head teachers have said that these are damaging education. Angela Rayner, the shadow education secretary, said predicted grades were “wrong in the vast majority of cases” and that disadvantaged students in particular lost out under the system.

Mail
Universities have been criticised for offering dozens of ‘Mickey Mouse’ degrees to pupils who under-achieve in their A-levels this week. Students who miss the grades needed for their original choices when their results come out tomorrow can opt for others with lower entry levels via clearing. Such courses on offer include football business, golf management, children’s books, wine business and make-up and hair design. Most charge full fees of £9,250 per year, meaning students can accumulate close to £30,000 of debt for tuition costs alone.

Police

Times
Almost all of the promised 20,000 police recruits must be used to tackle the “total collapse” of neighbourhood units in the last decade, a former Metropolitan Police chief has said. Richard Walton called for between 16,000 and 18,000 of the officers to become “bobbies on the beat” and make community policing the priority. In a report for the Policy Exchange think tank, the former head of Scotland Yard counterterrorism said that Boris Johnson’s pledge “represents a dramatic shift in policing policy after eight years of cuts to police budgets and police officer numbers”. He said the cuts had been accompanied by rising levels of serious and violent crime.

NHS

Times
EU citizens living in Britain will have to prove their right to free NHS care under a no-deal Brexit as part of new rules circulated to hospital managers. In a directive to the NHS the Department of Health said that trusts needed to prepare to charge EU citizens who had previously been eligible for free treatment “immediately after exit day”, which is scheduled for October 31. With only one million of the three million EU citizens living in Britain registered under the “settled status” programme, the move has led to accusations that ministers are creating a new “hostile environment” for immigrants.

Times
Doctors who use power and success to bully colleagues and ignore protocols are putting patients at risk, the General Medical Council has warned. Research commissioned by the doctors’ regulator highlighted “diva” personalities as one of five risky leadership subcultures threatening the safe running of hospitals and NHS trusts. It described them as healthcare professionals who were “viewed as untouchable” and not held to account for their inappropriate behaviour.

Rail travel

Telegraph
Commuters will face rail fare increases of almost 3 per cent in the new year, with the average season ticket hitting £3,000 for the first time, a new analysis suggests.  The Office of National Statistics (ONS) is on Wednesday expected to confirm RPI at between 2.7 and 3 per cent, leaving rail users facing another round of inflation-busting price hikes in January.  According to an analysis by Labour, which has compared fares on 183 train routes across the country, commuters can now expect to be paying up £3,067 for their season ticket, up from £2,980 last year.

Times
Rail passengers face another rise in fares amid warnings that they will look to other means of transport after a decade in which the cost of train travel has risen at double that of wages. The cost of regulated fares deemed essential for passengers, such as season and long-distance off-peak tickets, is allowed to rise at the start of each January, capped to the rate of the Retail Prices Index (RPI) from the last July. The figure, to be published by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) today and expected to be between 2.7 and 3 per cent, will cost many commuters who buy annual season tickets a further £90.

Morning Star
RAIL workers have condemned rising train fares as a “national disgrace.” Statistics published by the RMT union show that most travellers are struggling to keep up with ticket prices — 70 per cent of passengers surveyed have been negatively affected as a result of price hikes. The study comes as commuters get news today of the eye-watering fare increases due for 2020. The annual rise on most train fares is pegged to July’s Retail Prices Index (RPI) measure of inflation, which will be announced at 9.30am by the Office for National Statistics. Travellers fear that next year’s price hike could be as high as 3 per cent.

ITV News
Train commuters will “refuse to pay” if season ticket prices continue to be hiked, a rail campaign group has claimed. Railfuture issued the warning on the day passengers find out how much more expensive regulated fares could be from January 2. The UK, Scottish and Welsh Governments set a cap on the annual rise in most of these fares – which include season tickets – linked to July’s Retail Prices Index (RPI) measure of inflation.

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