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Telegraph
Theresa May’s final attempt to get a Brexit deal through Parliament appears doomed after a leaked document suggested it was nothing more than a “retread” of old ideas. The Prime Minister claims she has a “bold offer” to put to MPs next month, but The Telegraph has learnt that it contains nothing new on customs arrangements and retains the controversial Northern Irish backstop. To stand any chance of winning the vote, Mrs May must persuade Brexiteer Tory MPs who opposed her deal in the previous three votes to change their minds, but leading Eurosceptics said there was “nothing new” to tempt them. If Mrs May loses the vote in the first week of June, she will be expected to announce her resignation plans immediately and call a leadership election to find her replacement.

Sky News
Theresa May is preparing to put the final touches on her “bold offer” to MPs in a fourth and final attempt to get her Brexit deal through parliament. The prime minister is preparing to hold talks with senior ministers that she hopes will see them sign off on a supposedly enticing new package of measures to be included in her much-maligned withdrawal agreement, which has already been rejected three times by MPs.

Mirror
Theresa May has insisted her deal can get through parliament – despite having been defeated three times. The PM says she is making a “bold offer” to MPs as she makes a final attempt to get the withdrawal agreement through the Commons before she leaves as leader. Minister will begin discussions on Monday on a package of measures to be included in the forthcoming Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) aimed at securing cross-party support.

Express
THERESA MAY will today ramp up efforts to get her beleaguered Brexit deal through Parliament amid demands from Ministers that no deal preparations are accelerated. The Prime Minister will begin discussions on a new package of measures to be included in the forthcoming Withdrawal Agreement Bill (WAB) aimed at securing cross-party support. Mrs May is planning on offering MPs a “bold offer” in the hope it will be voted through Commons next month and before she steps down as Prime Minister.

Mail
Theresa May’s ‘bold new offer on Brexit‘ does not contain any significant new measures, Cabinet sources warned last night. The Prime Minister yesterday said the Withdrawal Agreement Bill, which MPs will vote on next month, would include ‘an improved package of measures that I believe can win new support’. Writing in The Sunday Times, Mrs May said MPs would face ‘decision time’ over whether they wanted to honour the 2016 referendum by leaving the European Union with a deal – or risk a No Deal departure or no Brexit at all.

Guardian
Theresa May will ask her cabinet to sign off a package of Brexit concessions this week, as she gears up for one last bid to win over MPs and salvage something concrete from her troubled premiership. With the Conservatives on course for a drubbing in Thursday’s European elections, the prime minister hopes the results will focus the minds of her own MPs and persuade them to support the long-awaited withdrawal agreement bill (WAB).

Sun
CABINET MINISTERS are preparing to urge Theresa May to scrap her final Brexit vote – saying it’s doomed to a thumping defeat. As a fresh row erupted over No Deal yesterday, one Minister said it would be better to allow a new leader to take over efforts to get a deal through Parliament. They said: “I’ll listen to what Theresa has to say in Cabinet on Tuesday but unless there’s a really big change we haven’t got a chance. “We can’t just go on using up all the lifelines.”

No deal

Times
Cabinet divisions re-emerged yesterday when the Brexit secretary called for planning for no-deal to be stepped up minutes before a colleague said that it should be ruled out in law. Stephen Barclay said MPs should “face facts” and accept that preparations must resume “at pace” if Theresa May’s European Union withdrawal agreement does not pass the Commons in a fortnight. In that scenario, he said, the choice would be between leaving without a deal or staying in the bloc.

Independent
Brexit secretary Stephen Barclay has warned that preparations for a no-deal scenario will have to be ramped up if MPs once again reject Theresa May’s deal. The threat comes as the prime minister prepares to make a “bold offer” this week on the Withdrawal Agreement Bill in a last-ditch attempt to secure backing for Brexit plans. As senior ministers jostled behind the scenes to replace the prime minister, Mr Barclay repeatedly refused to rule out standing in the looming Conservative leadership contest.

Express
BRITAIN should step up preparations for leaving the European Union without a deal if MPs fail to back Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement bill (WAB), Brexit Secretary Stephen Barclay has warned. Mr Barclay’s calls for no deal planning to brought forward “at pace” are likely to reignite the debate about the Government’s willingness to walk away from Brussels without first securing an accord. The comments come as Mrs May’s agreement is expected to be rejected for a fourth time when it returns to the House of Commons next month. Mr Barclay told Sky News’s Sophy Ridge on Sunday: “Members of Parliament do need to face facts, and if the deal were not to go through then there are only two alternatives – you either leave with a no-deal or you revoke.

Sky News
Preparations for a no-deal Brexit should be brought forward “at pace” if MPs do not back the prime minister’s deal, the Brexit secretary has warned. The comments are likely to reignite the debate about whether the government should be prepared to take the UK out of the European Union with no-deal if – as expected – MPs fail to back the withdrawal agreement when it returns to the House of Commons in June.

Conservative Party

Morning Star
THERESA MAY’S handling of Brexit could lead to Britain’s “first-ever Marxist government” a group of Tory MPs — including Winston Churchill’s grandson — warned today. The One Nation caucus of MPs, which includes Nicky Morgan, George Freeman and Sir Nicholas Soames, a descendant of Britain’s wartime prime minister, said the PM’s successor should be someone who stands a “chance” of avoiding further divisions in the country.

Express
THE CONSERVATIVE Party is heading not just for defeat, but for “annihilation” in Thursday’s European elections, and the vote could cause the “biggest revolution in our political system”, says a Tory MEP. According to a detailed YouGov survey published this week, the Conservatives are in fifth place behind the Brexit Party, Labour, the Lib Dems and the Greens.  The poll, with more than 7,000 respondents who were surveyed between May 12-16, shows that the Tories are heading “not just for defeat, but for annihilation” in the forthcoming EU vote, according to Tory MEP Daniel Hannan.

Mail
Seven Tory Cabinet ministers will today launch a bid to prevent Boris Johnson from leading Britain out of the EU without a deal if he becomes the next leader of the party. In a significant intervention, the 60-strong ‘One Nation Caucus’ of Conservative MPs will publish a ‘declaration of values’ rejecting ‘narrow nationalism’. The group last night said it aimed to ‘shift the Conservative Party towards the centre’.

Labour Party

Times
The free movement of people from the EU to Britain could continue even after the UK leaves, Jeremy Corbyn has said. In a relaxation of the party’s previous position that freedom of movement would end after Brexit, the Labour leader said yesterday that he was not “staunchly” against it. Asked why he was against freedom of movement, Mr Corbyn replied: “I’m not staunchly against freedom of movement. Our manifesto said the European system would not apply if you’re not in the European Union — but I quite clearly recognise there has to be a lot of movement of workers.

Independent
Jeremy Corbyn has given a robust defence of Labour’s decision to try to appeal to both leavers and remainers in this Thursday’s European elections. With an Observer poll suggesting Labour could be squeezed into third position behind Nigel Farage’s Brexit party and the pro-remain Liberal Democrats, Corbyn said he still wanted to bring the two sides of the Brexit divide together.

Times
Britain should consider paying reparations to its former colonies, Jeremy Corbyn has said. The Labour leader agreed in an interview with the musician Gaika for Dazed magazine that Britain has a “special responsibility” to the countries it colonised, especially as the government tries to combat climate change. He said: “The whole of Africa is making less emissions than any one European country, yet they are paying the price for global climate change.”

Independent
Jeremy Corbyn will plunge his own position into jeopardy if he “betrays” Labour supporters by refusing to push for a further Brexit referendum, a shadow minister has said, in an outspoken interview. Clive Lewis warned Mr Corbyn’s leadership would be “in peril” if he failed to fully support a Final Say public vote because the activists who “put you in that position” could turn against him.

CHUK

Independent
Chuka Umunna has called for Article 50 to be revoked, as he claimed there was insufficient time for a second referendum before the Brexit deadline in October. The change in strategy from Change UK‘s spokesperson comes after multiple polls showed the newly formed party struggling to gain ground in the polls ahead of this week’s European elections.  In what appeared to be an attempt to distinguish the party from other pro-European groups, the ex-Labour MP said: “I have come to the view that we are now at the point where we are going to need to revoke Article 50.”

LibDems

Times
The Conservative grandee Lord Heseltine faced calls to be expelled from the party after he revealed that he would vote for the Liberal Democrats in Thursday’s European elections. Lord Heseltine, a Conservative MP for 35 years and a former deputy prime minister, said his party had been “infected with the virus of extremism”, but refused to quit. Writing in The Sunday Times, he said: “The reason for my experiment with the Lib Dems is, of course, the government’s position on Brexit.

TBP

Telegraph
Nigel Farage has said that he would find it difficult to work with a future Tory leader who has backed Theresa May’s Brexit deal, ruling out a tie-up with Boris Johnson or Dominic Raab. Tory MPs are openly speculating on whether a future Conservative leader would come to a deal over contesting seats if a general election is called to deal with the Brexit impasse in Parliament.

Independent
More voters now say they would back the Brexit Party at a general election than the Conservatives, according to a new poll. Nigel Farage’s five-week-old outfit would finish second in the popular vote, pushing the Tories into third place, the research conducted by Opinium suggests. In total, the Brexit Party would collect 24 per cent of the ballot, with the Conservatives trailing on just 22 per cent, it was found. Labour would win with 27 per cent of the electorate backing them.

Breitbart
The poll-topping Brexit Party has vowed the show must go on after the venue it hired for a campaign rally cancelled the booking at short notice, claiming they don’t host political meetings — despite previously hosting the left-liberal Labour Party. A Brexit Party spokesman told Breitbart London the party had been contacted by the Swindon County Ground informing them of the decision to cancel the rally earlier this week, but not before the Brexit Party had already taken out adverts in local newspapers promoting the now sold-out event.

English Democrats

Express
BREXITEER Robin Tilbrook is “80-90 percent sure of success” in proving Britain has left the European Union in an upcoming High Court case against the Government – claiming “there isn’t a legal professional I haven’t spoken to who doesn’t think we can win”. The English Democrats chairman is expecting his case to be heard in the High Court within five to six weeks. His legal argument focuses on Theresa May not having the legal power to delay Brexit past the original deadline of March 29.

EU

Independent
Ireland‘s deputy prime minister has warned the European Union will not renegotiate the Brexit withdrawal agreement, regardless of who succeeds Theresa May as prime minister. Delivering a scathing assessment of the political logjam at Westminster, Simon Coveney said he was concerned Britain will “fail to get its act together over the summer”.  He also accused politicians of failing to understand the complexity of politics in Northern Ireland, and therefore “have tried to dumb down” the Brexit debate into the UK versus the EU.

Yahoo News
The EU will not renegotiate the Brexit withdrawal deal regardless of who the UK’s next prime minister is, Ireland’s foreign minister has warned. Simon Coveney described political events at Westminster as “extraordinary”, as he questioned the logic of politicians who believed a change of leader would deliver changes to the agreement struck by Theresa May.

BBC News
Ireland’s deputy prime minister has ruled out any renegotiation of the Brexit withdrawal deal if Theresa May is replaced as UK prime minister. Speaking on RTÉ, Tánaiste Simon Coveney said “the personality might change but the facts don’t”. He described Mrs May as a “decent person” and strongly criticised Conservative MPs at Westminster. Mrs May has promised to set a timetable for the election of her successor after the next Brexit vote.

Express
A VICTORY for Marine Le Pen’s far-right party in France in this week’s European elections would have “serious” consequences on the euro and the French economy, a minister has warned. Bruno Le Maire, France’s economy minister, said if Rassemblement National wins, the effects would be felt both at home and across the bloc. His comments come as Ms Le Pen’s party, formerly known as the National Front, is tied with President Emmanuel Macron’s centrist Republic On the Move in opinion polls.

Fox News
Tens of thousands of demonstrators opposed to right-wing populism and nationalism took to the streets in a number of European cities before May 23-26 elections to the European Parliament. Marches in Germany were held under the banner of “One Europe for Everyone: Your Voice Against Nationalism” in cities including Berlin, Cologne, Leipzig, Frankfurt, Munich and Hamburg.

Recycling

Times
Millions of plastic pots, tubs and trays placed in recycling bins are secretly being incinerated because of a lack of specialist facilities to process them. The plastic is collected from homes but rather than being turned into new products it is sent to “energy from waste” plants that burn it to generate electricity. A waste industry source said that more than half the pots, tubs and trays people had “diligently put in recycling bins” could be going to incinerators.

Post office

Sun
MORE THAN 2,500 post offices will be wiped out within a year unless ministers intervene, a trade body is warning. Business Secretary Greg Clark was last night told communities across the UK face “catastrophe” without Government action. In a blistering report, the National Federation of SubPostmasters (NFSP) warns that the Post Office network is “beyond tipping point” and urgent support is required to keep almost one in four branches going.

Education

Times
Universities have vowed to crack down on grade inflation in the first joint pledge to stop runaway numbers of first-class degrees. The collective action against dumbing down comes after the Department for Education and the student watchdog, the Office for Students, put pressure on institutions to tackle the issue. The announcement from Universities UK, which represents vice-chancellors, means that universities have agreed to protect the value of degree qualifications, be more transparent about how top degrees are awarded, and tackle perceptions of first-class degrees becoming easier to attain.

HS2

Times
Failure to build HS2 would be a “disaster” for the economy in the Midlands and north of England, the Treasury has been told amid growing concern that the project could be scrapped. More than 20 prominent figures in local government and business, including Andy Street, the Conservative mayor for the West Midlands, said that any decision to cancel the high-speed rail line would undermine Britain’s “national prosperity for decades to come”.

Times
Conservative Party members want to scrap HS2 and the foreign aid target, a poll for The Times has found. Fifty-seven per cent of Tory members, who are expected to choose the next prime minister later this year, thought the high-speed rail line should be cancelled and only 32 per cent believed the railway should continue, according to the YouGov poll.

Bees

Times
Bee species are disappearing from the east of England because of intensive farming, loss of habitat and climate change, a survey has found. Seventeen types of bee previously recorded in Bedfordshire, Cambridgeshire, Essex, Hertfordshire, Norfolk and Suffolk are no longer found in those counties, according to research by the wildlife charities Buglife and WWF. They include the great yellow bumblebee, the potter flower bee and the cliff mason bee.

Air travel

Mail
Engineers have now fixed a fuel issue which grounded dozens of flights yesterday in and out of Manchester Airport.  A power failure caused a problem with getting fuel into the jets, leading to many passengers being stranded on the runway, after planes were unable to be refuelled. However, thousands of passengers could still face delays today as staff battle a backlog following yesterday’s chaos.

Times
The aviation regulator is preparing to crack down on airlines that charge up to £160 to change a name on a ticket amid warnings that too many passengers are being stung by hidden costs. The Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) will order airlines to rewrite confusing booking rules to prevent travellers paying a “significant amount of money” to correct a simple mistake.

Torture

Times
The government has been accused of developing a secret policy on torture that allows ministers to sign off intelligence-sharing that could lead to the abuse of detainees. A freedom of information request has revealed that an internal Ministry of Defence policy document, dated November 2018, creates a provision for ministers to approve passing information to allies even if there is a risk of torture, if they judge that the potential benefits justify it.

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