Brexit

Guardian
The Bank of England governor has told banks to bolster their preparations for a no-deal Brexit. Andrew Bailey held a conference call on Tuesday with Britain’s biggest lenders in which he emphasised that they needed to step up their plans for Britain failing to secure a post-Brexit trade deal with the EU before a deadline at the end of 2020, Sky News reported. The central bank said on Wednesday: “It is fundamental to the Bank of England’s remit that it prepares the UK financial system for all risks that it might face. In performing that role, the governor meets the leadership of UK banks on a very regular basis. “As we have said previously, the possibility that negotiations between the UK and EU over a future trading relationship might not conclude in a deal is one of a number of outcomes that UK banks need to prepare for over the coming months.”

iNews
The Bank of England has warned Britain’s largest financial institutions to step up their preparations for a hard Brexit amid growing signs that trade talks with Brussels have reached an impasse. Andrew Bailey, the Governor of the UK’s central bank, told the chief executives of Britain’s biggest banks on Wednesday that there needed to be an intensification of measures to deal with the possibility of a “no trade deal” Brexit. His remarks, made during one of a series of regular private conference calls with senior banking executives, come amid increasing concern that talks between London and Brussels on a free trade agreement are deadlocked.

Illegal immigrants

Telegraph
European Union governments will refuse to negotiate an agreement to take back illegal migrants crossing the Channel to Britain if the UK does not back down in the Brexit trade talks, diplomats in Brussels warned on Wednesday. Talks are deadlocked over fishing, the level playing field guarantees, the future role of the European Court of Justice and Britain’s refusal to promise to stay in the European Convention of Human Rights. Britain will no longer be covered by the Dublin regulation once the Brexit transition period finishes at the end of the year.

Madeleine

Telegraph
Scotland Yard has identified a prime suspect in the disappearance of Madeleine McCann, senior officers disclosed last night. In the biggest breakthrough in the 13-year investigation, police said a 43-year-old German who is in jail in his homeland for child sexual offences was now suspected of involvement in the little girl’s disappearance. The man, whom they did not name, was in Praia da Luz on the day of Madeleine’s disappearance and received a telephone call in the area an hour before the girl vanished.

ITV News
A German child sex offender may have kidnapped Madeleine McMann after breaking into her family’s holiday apartment in Portugal, police have claimed. The Metropolitan Police have not named the man, 43, who is described as white with short blond hair, possibly fair, and about 6ft tall with a slim build. However Christian Hoppe, from Germany’s Federal Criminal Police Office (BKA), told the country’s ZDF television channel the man is serving a prison sentence for a sex crime and has two previous convictions for “sexual contact with girls”.

Star
A new suspect in the search for Madeleine McCann may have an accomplice who knows where her body is, German police have claimed. Met Police dramatically identified a German prisoner as a new suspect in the hunt for Maddie, who went missing in 2007. The suspect – who has previous convictions for sex offences against girls – was known have been around Praia da Luz on the Algarve coast at the time Maddie vanished on May 3 that year.

Sun
A NEW prime suspect in Madeleine McCann’s disappearance has sensationally been revealed as a German paedo in a huge breakthrough in the 13-year investigation. The 43-year-old prisoner has not been named by British cops but was living in a campervan in Praia da Luz in Portugal around the time the youngster vanished on May 3, 2007. And he is currently serving a seven-year jail term for raping a 72-year-old American tourist in 2005, according to a report by Braunschweig Zeitung.

Times
A German paedophile was identified last night as the key suspect in the disappearance of Madeleine McCann in the most significant breakthrough in the inquiry since she vanished 13 years ago. The serving prisoner is thought to have been in the Algarve resort where Madeleine was abducted from her bed shortly before her fourth birthday in May 2007. He is alleged to have discussed her disappearance in an internet chatroom. German police said that they were investigating the murder of Madeleine and described the 43-year-old suspect as a “multiple criminal sex offender, who has also been convicted of child sexual abuse”.

Mail
German detectives investigating Madeleine McCann’s disappearance say they have ‘almost enough evidence’ to charge a convicted paedophile currently serving jail time for rape with the three-year-old’s kidnap and murder. The suspect, a 43-year-old German drifter with a long history of sex crimes against women and children, was living in the resort Maddie vanished from in 2007 when she disappeared. Police revealed yesterday he made a 30-minute phone call that located him in Praia da Luz just an hour before the British girl was last seen on May 3, 2007. The following day he suspiciously transferred the ownership of his car to another person despite continuing to drive it, police said.

Covid-19

Telegraph
A former head of MI6 has said he believes the coronavirus pandemic “started as an accident” when the virus escaped from a laboratory in China. In an interview with The Telegraph, Sir Richard Dearlove said he had seen an “important” new scientific report suggesting the virus did not emerge naturally but was man-made by Chinese scientists. The apparent discovery will raise the prospect of China paying “reparations” for the death and economic catastrophe wreaked upon the world, the former intelligence chief said. It comes as Beijing faces growing pressure to explain precisely how coronavirus first began to spread late last year.

Sun
THE coronavirus pandemic “started as an accident” when the engineered virus escaped from a Chinese lab, a former MI6 chief has said. Sir Richard Dearlove says he’s seen an “important” new report which claims the virus didn’t emerge naturally. Instead, it was created by Chinese scientists before it accidentally leaked, Sir Richard told The Telegraph. And he claimed the report could force China to pay ‘reparations’ to the rest of the world for the death toll and economic hardship wrought by the virus.

Mail
The former chief of MI6 has claimed that the coronavirus escaped from a lab in China by accident.  Sir Richard Dearlove, who was head of the MI6, a role known informally as ‘C’, from 1999 until 2004, said he believes that Covid-19 is man-made.  He cited an ‘important’ report from Professor Angus Dalgleish of St George’s Hospital, University of London and Norwegian virologist Birger Sorensen which claims the virus was manufactured in a laboratory.  In the report, scientists claimed to have identified ‘inserted sections placed on the Sars-CoV-2 Spike surface’ which the virus uses to attach onto cells and observed they were ‘significantly different from any Sars we have studied’.

George Floyd

Sun
GEORGE Floyd had coronavirus when he died, according to a full-length autopsy report released on Wednesday. The Hennepin County Medical Examiner’s document confirmed Floyd died from a cardiac arrest “complicating law enforcement subdual, restraint and neck compression” – and that he was positive for COVID-19. “The decedent was known to be positive for 2019-nCoV RNA [COVID-19] on 4/3/2020,” the report stated. “Since PCR positivity for 2019-nCoV RNA [COVID-19] can persist for weeks after the onset and resolution of clinical disease, the autopsy result most likely reflects asymptomatic but persistent PCR positivity from previous infection.”

BBC News
Thousands of people have joined a protest in London over the death of African-American George Floyd in US police custody nine days ago. It comes as UK chief constables said they stand alongside all those “appalled and horrified” by his death. In a joint statement, they said the right to lawful protest was a “key part of any democracy”. But they stressed coronavirus restrictions, including not gathering in groups of more than six, remained. Protests began in the US after a video showed Mr Floyd, 46, being arrested on 25 May in Minneapolis and a white police officer continuing to kneel on his neck even after he pleaded that he could not breathe.

Breitbart
Tens of thousands of people chanting “no justice, no peace, no racist police” marched through central London on Wednesday to protest against racism after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis. Floyd, an unarmed black man, died after a white police officer knelt on his neck, an event that has set off the biggest anti-racism protests seen in the United States since the 1960s civil rights era. Demonstrators have also come out in cities around the world in solidarity with Floyd and to express anger over racism.

Quarantine

Telegraph
Boris Johnson last night pushed ahead with his quarantine policy despite is chief scientific adviser declining to explicitly back the plan. The Prime Minister faced criticism from the Tory backbenches, including the former Prime Minister Theresa May, for forcing “unnecessary economic isolation” on Britain with the policy, which was described by one airline boss as “shutting the stable door after the horse has bolted”. Speaking as the quarantine plans were formally presented to Parliament, Ms May said there would be “no global Britain” without international air travel which was essential for trade.

Mirror
Theresa May has led a furious Tory backlash against plans to force thousands of business leaders, tourists and travellers to quarantine for 14 days on arrival in the UK. The former Prime Minister joined ex-Cabinet ministers and backbench MPs lashing out at the plans as they were formally introduced to Parliament today. Almost all new arrivals to the UK – including returning Brits – will be forced to isolate for 14 days starting Monday 8 June to stop new outbreaks of coronavirus.

Express
THERESA May has been told to keep her views on Brexit to herself by a eurosceptic think tank – which also accused her of failing to deliver on the clear instruction to take the UK out of the EU during her time as Prime Minister. Mrs May quizzed her replacement in Downing Street, Boris Johnson, about what Brexit would mean for data sharing and border security. However, the Bruges Group quickly took to social media, tweeting: “We don’t need to hear Theresa May’s opinion about Brexit, or our post-transition relationship with the EU. “Her Government failed comprehensively to deliver on the instructions of the British people, which is why Boris Johnson is now Prime Minister.”

Times
The Conservative rebellion against the prime minister’s travel quarantine grew yesterday as senior figures in the party lined up to attack the plan and the science behind it. Theresa May accused  Boris Johnson of bringing in measures that would “close Britain off from the rest of the world”. She claimed that without international travel “there is no global Britain”. The former prime minister was joined by two former cabinet ministers and a string of Tory MPs who described the measures as disproportionate and economically damaging.

Mirror
Stringent new laws will impose a 14-day quarantine on thousands who arrive in England from Monday. Anyone arriving from June 8 – including returning Brits – must fill out a form stacked with personal travel details and then go into isolation. Escapees can be fined £1,000 and the most serious offenders prosecuted in a bid to stop the spread of coronavirus from overseas. Tory MPs have staged a mutiny, warning the rules will crush the airline industry and cripple the economy.

Times
Leading scientists warned last night that Boris Johnson’s two-week foreign quarantine plans made “no sense” as Downing Street’s own chief scientific adviser distanced himself from the policy. The government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage) was not consulted on the decision to make all arrivals in Britain self-isolate for two weeks. There is frustration among some members that introducing the restrictions on Monday is “not following the science”. Yesterday Theresa May led a Conservative rebellion against the measure, which Tory MPs said would inflict “unnecessary economic isolation” on the country.

Care homes

BBC News
Large numbers of staff could have been unknowingly spreading coronavirus through care homes, according to the UK’s largest charitable care home provider. Data from MHA shows 42% of its staff members who recently tested positive were not displaying symptoms. Nearly 45% of residents who had a positive test were also asymptomatic. MHA operates in England, Scotland and Wales and has fully tested staff and residents in 86 of its 90 homes so far. A Department for Health and Social Care spokesperson said: “Our priority is to ensure care workers and those receiving care are protected, and the latest statistics show over 60% of care homes have had no outbreak at all.

Treatment

Telegraph
The World Health Organization is to resume a trial into a controversial coronavirus treatment after suspending it over safety concerns flagged in a paper published in the Lancet medical journal. The WHO announced it would resume a trial into hydroxychloroquine after the Lancet admitted there were “serious scientific questions” surrounding the data in a paper it published on the treatment.  The Lancet paper said the treatments had no benefits and may even put patients at risk of dying, leading the WHO to suspend its trial into the treatments last month.

Education

Guardian
The government’s desperate push to reopen primary schools in England to kickstart the economy has fallen flat, with up to 90% in some areas remaining closed to more pupils amid rising fears about the spread of coronavirus. Figures obtained by the Guardian showed that in large parts of the north-east not a single primary school opened to more pupils on Monday, the government’s target date for reopening after the 10-week lockdown. Data from 11 of the 12 biggest local authorities in the region, which has the highest Covid-19 infection rate in the UK, showed just 12% of their 856 primary schools admitted additional pupils on Monday.

Private hospitals

Times
Ministers have been accused of wasting hundreds of millions of pounds of taxpayers’ money on private hospitals that are sitting almost completely idle. Consultants say that most private hospitals are either empty or hosting only a trickle of NHS patients since being taken over at the start of the pandemic. They are pleading with the government to be allowed back to work as waiting lists grow by the day. Some private hospitals are closed entirely and others have been conducting only one operation per theatre per day, it is estimated.

Cancer

Sun
Cancer has overtaken the coronavirus as the leading cause of death in the UK as the Covid-19 pandemic continues to cause further delays to treatment. Experts have now warned that the country needs an emergency national response similar to that of the pandemic in order to beat the backlog. Data from the Office for National Statistics (ONS) yesterday revealed that just one in five deaths in the week ending May 22 had been due to the coronavirus, while the number of excess deaths in the UK since the coronavirus outbreak began is now just under 62,000.

Antibiotics

Times
Scientists have landed a blow in the fight against superbugs with an antibiotic that can wipe out some of the most dangerous bacteria without them developing resistance. Researchers from Princeton University in the US said that the new compounds, which are being called irresistins, act like a “poison arrow”. They pierce the outer wall of the bacteria and destroy a substance that lies inside called folate, an essential building block of the microbe’s genetic material.

5G

Times
A Japanese telecoms company is in talks with the government about providing technology for Britain’s 5G network, in the latest sign that ministers want to avoid reliance on Huawei as the UK adjusts its ties with China. Talks with NEC started last month, according to Bloomberg. Samsung, of South Korea, will also soon be invited for talks as part of the plan to diversify the network supply chain, it was reported. A Tory rebellion over Huawei has swollen since 36 MPs voted against the government in March.

Voice of Europe
British Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been forced by his own party to forego his plan to have a Chinese company build his country’s 5G network. China will be phased out altogether by 2023. The PM came under pressure following criticisms of China’s role in spreading disinformation during the early phases of the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. US President Donald Trump had asked Johnson to “back away” from contracting with the Chinese company Huawei to build his country’s 5G network in January.

Hong Kong

Times
China warned Britain to “step back from the brink” after Boris Johnson vowed to offer a path to citizenship for up to three million Hong Kong residents threatened by Beijing’s draconian new security law. Britain has “no sovereignty, no jurisdiction and no supervision over Hong Kong” Beijing warned, adding that the prime minister must “immediately stop interfering in Hong Kong’s affairs and China’s internal affairs, or this will definitely backfire”.

Guardian
China’s foreign ministry has accused Britain of “gross interference” in the country’s affairs after Boris Johnson said he would offer millions of Hong Kong residents a path to UK citizenship if Beijing pushed ahead with a controversial security law for the city. The ministry’s spokesman Zhao Lijian told Britain to “step back … otherwise there will be consequences” and said China had made “serious representations” to London over its offer to holders of British national (overseas) passports. Although pro-democracy politicians and protesters in Hong Kong welcomed Britain’s offer, most said they would prefer international efforts to focus also on protection for the city.

Breitbart
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has issued a stark rebuke to the Chinese Communist Party (CCP), saying that Great Britain will not “walk away” from the people of Hong Kong. Mr Johnson promised to implement one of the “biggest changes” to the UK’s visa system in order to save the people of Hong Kong from the authoritarian measures that the communist regime is set to impose on the city. Boris Johnson said that if China decides to go forward with imposing an authoritarian national security law on Hong Kong, it will be in “direct conflict” with the Sino-British Joint Declaration.

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