Brexit

Times
The pro-EU campaigner Gina Miller has vowed to challenge Boris Johnson in the courts if he tries to suspend parliament to pursue a no-deal Brexit. Ms Miller, a businesswoman, previously went to the Supreme Court to secure parliament a vote on whether to formally begin the Brexit process. She said that if Mr Johnson tried to prorogue parliament as prime minister it “would be an abuse of his powers”. A legal team working for Ms Miller, 54, sent a letter to Mr Johnson last week, warning that “parliament could not be bypassed”.

Breitbart
An anti-Brexit activist who won a major legal case against the British government said Sunday she will go to court again if the next prime minister tries to take the UK out of the European Union without a deal. Businesswoman Gina Miller said she instructed her lawyers to serve notice to Conservative Party lawmaker Boris Johnson in anticipation of him becoming the next prime minister. Johnson is the favourite to succeed Theresa May as prime minister later this month. He says it is imperative Britain leaves the EU on the rescheduled date of October 31st.

Express
GINA MILLER has accused Boris Johnson of being ready to “abandon parliamentary sovereignty” and reduce the UK to a “dictatorship” as she gets ready to launch a legal action to prevent him from proroguing Parliament. The businesswoman whose legal action forced Theresa May to ask for Parliament’s permission before triggering Article 50, has announced today she has reassembled her legal team to “defend Parliament’s sovereignty”. And she has also launched a scathing attack against the frontrunner in the Tory leadership contest for failing to rule out shutting down Parliament to keep his promise and deliver a no deal Brexit on October 31.

BBC News
Anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller says she will take the government to court if the next PM tries to shut down Parliament to push through no deal. Ms Miller, who won a legal battle against ministers over Article 50, said the step would be “an abuse” of powers. She told Sky News she wanted to “defend Parliamentary sovereignty”, not stop Brexit. Brexiteer MP Priti Patel said it was “not acceptable” to use the courts to try to tie the hands of MPs. Most MPs are against leaving the EU without a deal and could try to stop it from happening.

ITV News
Any future attempt by a Boris Johnson-led Government to “bypass” Parliament to pursue a no-deal Brexit “would be beyond a prime minister’s powers”, campaigner Gina Miller has said. Businesswoman Ms Miller announced she and her legal team had written to Mr Johnson arguing any move to prorogue Parliament “would be an abuse of his powers” and would result in legal action.

Huffington Post
Anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller has vowed to take the government to court if the next prime minister tries to shut down parliament in order to push through a no-deal Brexit.  Miller – whose legal team successfully forced Theresa May to give MPs a vote before triggering Article 50 – said the act of ‘proroguing’ parliament would be “beyond a prime minister’s powers”.  Parliamentary sovereignty is the “jewel in the constitutional crown”, the activist told Sky News on Sunday.  “To bypass it, to close the doors of parliament, we feel… that that would be beyond a prime minister’s powers,” Miller added, saying her reassembled legal team had looked at case law on the subject.

Mirror
Campaigner Gina Miller has announced she’ll fight Boris Johnson in the High Court if he tries to bypass Parliament over Brexit. The businesswoman revealed her legal team has already written to the PM frontrunner warning he must not ignore MPs’ views on No Deal.  Mr Johnson – who is set to become Prime Minister in 10 days – has refused to rule out “proroguing” (suspending) parliament to prevent MPs blocking a no deal exit on October 31.

Independent
Campaigner Gina Miller is launching legal action to stop Boris Johnson suspending parliament in order to force through EU withdrawal without a deal. The businesswoman’s lawyers have written to the probable next prime minister warning it would be “constitutionally unacceptable” and unlawful for him to lock MPs out of the Commons to stop them from blocking a no-deal outcome. She has assembled the same legal team that successfully forced Theresa May in early 2017 to grant MPs a vote before triggering the Article 50 process that set the clock ticking on the UK’s exit from the EU.

Times
Philip Hammond vowed to oppose a no-deal Brexit from the back benches in a valedictory speech to civil servants last week, The Times has learnt. The chancellor also used his address at an all-staff meeting at the Treasury to tell his department that they should not change their advice on the consequences of leaving the EU without a deal in an effort to suit the priorities of a government led by Boris Johnson. Mr Hammond, who is expected to be sacked by the new prime minister after 21 years on the Conservative front bench, is understood to have told his officials: “It has not escaped my attention that the next prime minister’s majority will be only three, and that I will be a backbencher.”

BBC News
Philip Hammond has warned the UK will not be able to control key elements of a no-deal Brexit. The chancellor told BBC Panorama that if the UK leaves without a deal, then the EU will control many of the levers – including what happens at the French port of Calais. Ex Brexit Secretary David Davis told the programme that Whitehall never believed a no-deal Brexit would happen. The EU has set the UK a deadline of 31 October to leave the bloc. But despite spending £4.2bn on Brexit preparations, Mr Hammond warned that the government has limited influence on how a no-deal scenario might look.

Independent
Chancellor Philip Hammond has warned that a no-deal Brexit  could leave the new prime minister at the mercy of French president Emmanuel Macron, who could use access to the port of Calais as a way to exert pressure on the UK. The warning came as a senior member of Jeremy Corbyn’s shadow cabinet said Labour is “likely” to go into the next general election as a Remain party offering a second referendum on EU membership.

Express
THE UK will lose control of Brexit if it leaves without a deal on October 31, with the EU likely to “dial up or down” the goods flow as much as they want. That’s the fear of Chancellor Philip Hammond who said Britain will lose its say over what happens at the borders if no deal becomes a reality. The Chancellor of the Exchequer has provided £4.2billion for no deal Brexit preparations. But he believes no sum of money will fully prepare Britain for an exit scenario without an agreement in place.  A no deal Brexit, he said, would see the UK losing control of what happens outside of its borders, with Britain no longer able to have a say regarding what happens, for example, in France’s Calais.

Ireland

Times
Direct rule will be imposed in Northern Ireland within the next three months to see through Brexit, ministers believe. Senior Conservatives believe that only a delay to the exit date from the European Union or the restoration of the Stormont assembly would prevent the British government from taking control of the province. It has been reported that senior civil servants in Belfast fear that they are being asked to make decisions that were once made by members of the Northern Irish assembly.

TBP

Breitbart
Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has vowed his Brexit Party will “replace the British Conservative Party” if Boris Johnson betrays Brexit. Speaking to Breitbart News editor-in-chief Alex Marlow on his SiriusXM Patriot radio show, Mr Farage traced much of Britain’s current problems to the fact that many Brexit campaigners took Theresa May — a Remain voter — at her word when she took over from David Cameron and promised the Leave vote would be respected, even if it meant leaving the European Union without a bilateral agreement, or “deal”.

Express
THE Brexit Party have threatened to wreak havoc in Strasbourg today as they warn EU bosses they will not “relent” until Britain has left the Union. Brexit Party MEP Martin Daubney mocked the EU’s cheif Brexit negotiator Guy Verhofstadt when he asked: “Can you smell Mr Verhofstadt’s fear?” in a scathing put down on Twitter. The Leave supporting politicians will travel to Strasbourg on Monday ahead of the vote on the next European Commission President on Tuesday.  Martin Daubney MEP tweeted: “Can anybody else smell Mr Verhofsdat’s fear? We will see you in Strasbourg on Monday… and not relent until we Leave the EU & #ChangePoliticsForGood.”

EU

Telegraph
A hard Brexit could be made more likely because European Union leaders have failed to grasp the hardening of opinion in Britain, Latvia’s foreign minister has warned.  Edgars Rinkēvics, who has served as the Baltic state’s chief diplomat for eight years, said a mutual gulf of understanding between London and Brussels means revising the Withdrawal Agreement before the October 31 deadline will be “extremely difficult.” And he warned that Boris Johnson’s plan to use hard Brexit as a “credible threat” in negotiations was based on a false assumption about the European position and the speed with which the EU can move.

Times
President Macron celebrated Europe’s push for a shared military force at a Bastille Day parade yesterday punctuated by jeers from gilet-jaune protesters. Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, and nine other European leaders joined Mr Macron to review the aerial display and a march by 4,000 members of the armed forces along the Champs-Élysées. David Lidington, the Cabinet Office minister, attended as deputy to Theresa May.

Express
ON Tuesday in Strasbourg we’ll see the European Parliament’s only moment of real power for the next five years. It can approve or reject Jean-Claude Juncker’s chosen successor as European Commission President – German defence minister Ursula von der Leyen. Usually a key vote like this is agreed in advance but MEPs across Europe feel betrayed that the candidate was just dumped on them. Many are also furious that key committee positions have gone to federalists, rather than being shared among all parties in line with the parliament’s precious D’Hondt system.

Tory leadership

Telegraph
The Conservatives have set up a “membership hotline” to help activists amid fears some of them have not been receiving their ballot papers. The grassroots Campaign for Conservative Democracy said that members had inadvertently lost their right to vote because standing orders have not been increased or debit cards have run out. John Strafford, the campaign’s spokesman, said he had heard of “a number of problems regarding credit card renewals and standing orders”. He said: “One would have hoped by now that these things would have been sorted out. It is cock up in the administration of central office.”

Times
Boris Johnson wants to make resetting relations with President Trump one of his first acts in Downing Street by travelling to the US to negotiate a post-Brexit trade deal. The former foreign secretary is ready to fly there as soon as possible if he wins the leadership contest to try to secure a limited agreement in time for his “do or die” deadline of October 31. “The key to the whole thing is the US. If we get a trade deal with America we will be very quickly in the market for other deals. It encourages others to realise that we mean business,” an ally of Mr Johnson said.

Mail
Boris Johnson intends to travel to the United States within weeks of being elected Tory leader and Prime Minister, to rebuild relations with Donald Trump and secure a limited trade deal, a close ally has said. The former foreign secretary believes fast forward motion on a UK-US trade deal is ‘key’ to securing Britain’s future post Brexit, the associate told The Times. The leadership front-runner has staked his candidacy on a promise to leave the EU by October 31, ‘deal or no deal’. The source said: ‘The key to the whole thing is the US. ‘If we get a trade deal with America we will be very quickly in the market for other deals.

Breitbart
Reports suggest that Tory leadership favourite Boris Johnson may purge Remainers opposed to delivering Brexit, deal or no deal, from his Cabinet. The former Foreign Secretary and two-time Mayor of London is concerned that staunch anti-Brexiteers such as Amber Rudd, who now say they would serve under a Prime Minister Johnson, are only doing so in hopes they will be able to dissuade him from leaving the EU on No Deal terms if the bloc will not agree to a less onerous withdrawal agreement than the one offered to Theresa May.

Diplomatic leaks

Mail
Theresa May did not order the police to muzzle the Press over the row about leaked diplomatic cables, Whitehall sources said last night. Scotland Yard sparked a furious backlash over the weekend after issuing an aggressive warning that journalists who published leaked documents could face jail. The warning came after Sir Kim Darroch resigned as Britain’s ambassador to Washington last week in the wake of the row over leaked diplomatic cables in which he described Donald Trump as ‘inept’. Human rights lawyers claimed yesterday that the police had acted in order to ‘protect the Government from embarrassment’.

Labour Party

Independent
Shadow foreign secretary Emily Thornberry has departed from Labour policy by saying the party should campaign for Remain in any referendum on a Brexit deal “regardless of which party has negotiated it”. Her comments came at a People’s Vote rally in Boris Johnson’s constituency of Uxbridge and Ruislip South where she denounced the probable next prime minister as a “lazy, incompetent (and) dangerous” figure who wants to deliver the UK into the hands of the “racist, sexist, bullying monstrosity” Donald Trump. Ms Thornberry’s appearance on the People’s Vote platform made her the first senior Labour figure to take advantage of this week’s policy shift – unveiled by Jeremy Corbyn after months of wrangling within the shadow cabinet and trade unions – which commits the party to campaigning for a Final Say referendum and Remain vote on any Brexit outcome produced by the Tory government.

BBC News
The BBC has been told there will be a concerted push for Labour to adopt an independent process for dealing with complaints of anti-Semitism. A group will make the demand at Monday’s regular meeting of MPs. But political correspondent Iain Watson said it would also, crucially, be made at the next meeting of Labour’s ruling national executive later this month. Emily Thornberry said earlier Labour must heed “the message” on anti-Semitism, not attack the “messengers”. The shadow foreign secretary told the BBC’s Andrew Marr “nobody can pretend there isn’t an ongoing problem” within the party and with “our processes for dealing with it”.

Mail
Labour anti-Semitism whistleblowers today threatened to sue the party for suggesting they were motivated by damaging Jeremy Corbyn.  Former officials Sam Matthews and Louise Withers Green said they had been defamed by Labour in its response to a bombshell Panorama expose. The damning programme – shown on Wednesday – included claims that senior figures, including general secretary Jennie Formby, interfered in anti-Semitism investigations.  Deputy leader Tom Watson described the allegations as ‘chilling’ and demanded action from the party.

Iran

Times
Jeremy Hunt vowed to save the imperilled nuclear deal with Iran as he suspended his leadership campaign to “do what it takes” and discuss it with his European counterparts today. The foreign secretary had planned to send a junior minister to Brussels to the foreign affairs council, at which Iran is top of the agenda. However, the precarious state of the deal persuaded him to attend himself, an ally told The Times. Mr Hunt spoke over the weekend to Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Iranian foreign minister, signalling a compromise offer that Britain would ensure that Gibraltar released a detained oil tanker if Iran guaranteed that it would not deliver its cargo to Syria.

Independent
European powers including the UK have warned that their continued support for the Iran nuclear deal is dependent on Tehran coming back in line with provisions limiting its stockpiles of enriched uranium. As foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt travelled to Brussels for talks with EU counterparts on Iran scheduled for Monday, the so-called E3 nations – Britain, France and Germany – issued a last-ditch bid to keep the four-year-old deal alive, calling for “signs of goodwill” from the Islamic republic.

Guardian
Tensions in the Middle East could pose an existential threat to mankind unless the Iran nuclear deal is maintained, Jeremy Hunt will say on Monday in his starkest warning since the regional crisis escalated two months ago. Speaking ahead of an EU meeting in Brussels, the UK foreign secretary will try to underline the importance of the deal, which was abandoned unilaterally by the US a year ago, leading to an accelerating reciprocal withdrawal by Iran. Hunt has tried to de-escalate the situation by saying an Iranian-owned oil tanker seized by the British off Gibraltar 10 days ago might be released if Tehran promised the ship’s owners would abandon plans to unload its oil in Syria.

NHS

Telegraph
NHS hospitals are increasingly forcing disabled patients to pay for parking, an investigation reveals. The number of NHS sites charging patients even though they have a blue badge has risen by almost a fifth in just three years, the figures show.  The flagship Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London has just become the latest to plan such charges, prompting fury from elected patient governors. Disability campaigners said the changes were “disgraceful,” and could mean that some of the most vulnerable in society could end up losing access to care because they could not afford it. Labour urged ministers to step in to axe the charges.

Energy

Mail
Millions of loyal households are being ‘exploited’ by energy giants that charge them as much as £324 a year more than new customers. Energy firms routinely raise prices for longstanding customers while new ones get a far cheaper deal, research reveals. It means gas and electricity customers now face a loyalty penalty of up to a third of their bill if they fail to regularly switch deals. It is estimated that customers are collectively losing out on around £1.9billion as a result, figures by auto-switching service Look After My Bills showed.

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