Trade talks

Mail
Boris Johnson today brutally slapped down Michel Barnier after the EU negotiator demanded Britain signs up to EU rules to get a trade deal. The PM insisted there is no need to tie the UK to Brussels regulations, or vice versa, as he condemned growing protectionism around the world.  Arguing that he wants to be a champion of free trade now Brexit has happened, Mr Johnson dismissed claims that Britain will undercut social and environmental standards – saying it was often ahead of the bloc.  The defiant stance – in a 30-minute speech in which the premier notably declined to use the word ‘Brexit’ – came minutes after Mr Barnier warned that Britain will only get a ‘best in class’ trade deal if it bows to demands on a ‘level playing field’ and access to fishing waters. He said the bloc was ready to strike an ‘ambitious’ package with the UK, including zero tariffs and quotas and covering the crucial services sector. But he insisted that would be ‘conditional’ on Britain committing to keep the current social and environmental standards – as well as letting the European fishing fleet in.

Times
Boris Johnson has declared that Britain does not need a trade deal with the EU as Brussels opened talks with a “red rag” demand for a final say over Britain’s industrial and competition policy. The next phase of Brexit began in acrimony yesterday as the prime minister sought to turn Brussels’s own demands against it in pursuit of a Canada-style trade agreement. Mr Johnson said the UK would emerge as a “campaigner for global free trade” at the same time as warning that he would rather accept tariffs than EU law.

Independent
Business is appealing for clarity on future trading arrangements with the EU after Boris Johnson made clear he is ready to take the country to a no-deal Brexit at the end of this year. The pound tumbled against the euro and US dollar after Mr Johnson used a high-profile speech to declare he would walk away without a free trade agreement if Brussels insisted on the UK keeping to European rules on state aid or social and environmental protections or being subject to the rulings of the European Court of Justice.

Sun
BORIS Johnson has told the EU he will pull the plug on any trade deal if it means following Brussels rules, in what allies have dubbed his “Mad Man” strategy. The PM issued the threat as the EU’s negotiations boss Michel Barnier laid out a stringent series of tough terms that the UK must meet. An agreement must be in place by the end of the 11 month-long transition period that expires on December 31 or both sides face punishing trade quotas and tariffs on exports. Laying down the gauntlet, Boris declared: “We have made our choice; we want a comprehensive free trade agreement, similar to Canada’s.

ITV News
Boris Johnson and Michel Barnier have set out their goals for a future trade deal between the UK and EU, exposing a gulf that needs bridging before an agreement can be reached. Prime Minister Johnson says he wants a Canada-style trade deal with the EU, but the EU is demanding the UK sign up to regulations on state subsidies, environmental standards and workers’ rights. The EU wants a “level playing field” and to ensure “competition remains open and fair” before such an agreement can be signed. The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator Mr Barnier also wants the EU to have access to Britain’s fishing waters.

Guardian
The gulf between the UK and EU’s goals in trade talks has been laid bare as Boris Johnson threatened to walk away with no deal at the end of the year rather than sign up to EU rules on competition and state aid. Speaking in Greenwich, the prime minister made clear that his preference was for a Canada-style deal with no tariffs, but he said he would rather accept a loose “Australian-style” relationship with the EU that involved tariffs than accept alignment with any Brussels regulations or oversight by European courts.

Huffington Post
Britain and the EU have both set out tough objectives for the crucial next phase of the Brexit negotiations.  Boris Johnson  and EU chief negotiator Michel Barnier both want the same thing – a comprehensive free trade deal with agreements in other areas like security once the current standstill transition period finishes at the end of December. But they were both uncompromising in key speeches on Monday setting out their opening positions.

Fisheries

Express
BREXIT has happened and the UK is now out of the European Union and ready to negotiate trade deals and its future arrangements with the bloc. What will Brexit mean for EU fishing laws? With Brexit done the country has entered into an 11-month transition period during which the current agreements will remain in place while new ones are negotiated. And Prime Minister Boris Johnson is already primed to reject EU demands on fishing.

Breitbart
The EU’s chief negotiator on a UK trade agreement, Michel Barnier, has said there will be no trade deal without continued EU access to British territorial fishing waters. On the day that Prime Minister Boris Johnson lays out his plans for a Canada-style free trade agreement, Mr Barnier has said that the UK must cross one of its own red lines by linking a deal to access to fishing waters.

Evening Standard
Michel Barnier told Boris Johnson that Britain can have an “ambitious” trade deal with the EU — but warned that fishing rights must be on the table and European regulations will be applied in some areas. The EU chief negotiator said any trade deal would be “less favourable” to the UK than the terms it enjoyed as a member of the European Union before Brexit took place on Friday. He spoke out as the Prime Minister made a keynote speech setting out the UK position in talks on trade, security and other agreements.

Evening Standard
The European Union has set out battle lines for its post-Brexit  trade negotiations with Britain.  Michel Barnier, the bloc’s chief Brexit negotiator, said the EU was prepared to offer quota and tariff free access to the single market – dependent on two key points. Outlining the bloc’s stance this morning, he said these were: Measures to ensure competition remains open and fair; An agreement on fisheries with “reciprocal access”; He insisted that the EU wanted an ambitious deal – but reiterated the stance that such a plan was dependent on Britain’s actions.

Independent
Britain will have to stay aligned to EU rules in a whole set of areas after Brexit if it wants a trade deal, the bloc’s chief negotiator has said. Michel Barnier said tariff- and quota-free access to EU markets was dependent on the inclusion of “a mechanism to uphold the high standards we have on social, environmental, tax, and state aid matters today and in their future developments”. He also said a deal was “conditional” on an agreement giving EU fishing fleets access to British waters, and that it would be governed by the EU’s European Court of Justice.

Mirror
Boris Johnson has said Britain will stand up for free trade by abandoning EU market rules. Setting out his vision for Britain’s post-Brexit future Mr Johnson confirmed Britain would try and break with the EU on economic regulation. But Brussels hit back at Mr Johnson’s aggressive posturing by saying that any deal would be “ambitious” but “must include a deal on fisheries”. Access to fishing waters has long been a sore point for Brexiteers who want Britain to have greater control of fishing in UK waters to support our domestic industry.

Guardian
Michel Barnier has reminded Boris Johnson that he has already agreed in a “very important” declaration to stay true to EU rules on subsidies and standards, as Brussels staked out its opening position on the EU’s future relationship with the UK. Responding to the prime minister’s claim that there would be no need for Britain to continue to respect EU regulations under a trade deal, the EU’s chief negotiator pointed to the “political declaration” agreed last year with Johnson, while admitting that alignment was a “red rag” to Westminster.

EU

Independent
The national parliaments of EU member states may not be given a vote to approve the EU’s Brexit trade deal with the UK, Brussels has indicated. EU officials said they are “confident” that the scope of the agreement with Britain will be narrow enough that parliaments do not have to be given a vote – but said it might be decided to give them one anyway. Under EU law, there are two types of trade agreements: “EU-only” deals and “mixed” deals.

Express
A FRENCH MEP has branded Britain’s departure from the European Union as a “slap in the face” and he warned the Brussels bloc in its current form was “doomed to fail”. The vice-president of France’s right-wing Rassemblement National (RN) party Jordan Bardella said on Friday that Brexit was “a slap in the face” for the European Union, as he warned that the now 27-member bloc had to undergo deep change or face collapse. M Bardella, who is also a member of the European Parliament, told the news channel BFM-TV: “Brexit is a slap in the face for the European Union.

Terrorism

Times
Dozens of convicted Islamist extremists are due be released from jail this year including terrorists who planned to use knives in plots with striking similarities to the Streatham attack. Counterterrorism police and the security services have been preparing for the release of about 40 convicted terrorists over the next 12 months after two knife attacks by recently freed extremists. Releases could be halted under plans announced yesterday by Robert Buckland, the justice secretary, for emergency legislation that could require terrorists to serve at least two thirds of their sentences before being considered for parole.

Telegraph
More than a dozen jihadi terrorists are due to be freed early from jail within months, as ministers scramble to introduce emergency legislation to keep them behind bars. The Government has promised new laws in the wake of the broad daylight attack on a south London high street by Sudesh Amman, a convicted terrorist who has been released half way through his sentence just days before. It was the second terrorist onslaught on London by a freed prisoner in just two months.

Mirror
A new ’emergency law’ to end early release for terrorists will apply to serving prisoners, the government has announced. Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said it was necessary to introduce the extraordinary measure because Britain faces an “unprecedented” situation. Ministers are bracing for legal challenges to the decision. Mr Buckland said: “Yesterday’s appalling incident makes the case plainly for immediate action. “We cannot have the situation, as we saw tragically in yesterday’s case, where an offender – a known risk to innocent members of the public – is released early by automatic process of law without any oversight by the Parole Board.

Sky News
Proposed emergency laws to stop convicted terrorists being released early might be illegal, according to the UK’s former reviewer of terror legislation.  Lord Carlile, who held the role from 2001 to 2011, has cast doubt on whether changes to the release conditions of those already sentenced could be applied retrospectively. The government pledged action after Streatham attacker Sudesh Amman, 20, stabbed two people a week after being released half way through his sentence for spreading extremist material

Times
The terrorist who stabbed two people in a busy shopping street had been released from prison despite telling fellow inmates that he wanted to murder an MP and intended to “do something real”. Sudesh Amman, 20, was released from Belmarsh jail ten days before he was shot dead by police surveillance officers during a knife attack in Streatham, south London, on Sunday.

Mail
Hundreds of terrorists already in jail will be kept locked up for longer under sweeping new laws to be introduced in the wake of the Streatham knife attack. Justice Secretary Robert Buckland also announced a major review yesterday which could see terrorists jailed for life or permanent conditions placed on their release. The UK faces an ‘unprecedented situation of severe gravity’, he said, after Sudesh Amman knifed two people just days after he was freed from Belmarsh jail.

Scotland

Mail
Scots are split down the middle over whether to break up the UK, according to a poll today. The threat to the union has been underlined by research showing voters north of the border are divided 50-50 on the issue of independence.  The Survation poll, which discounts undecideds, is the latest to show the result of a referendum – which Nicola Sturgeon has been demanding – would be too close to call.  Last week a YouGov survey found 51 per cent would support independence – the first time the firm has recorded a majority in favour since 2015.

Coronavirus

Mail
Health Secretary Matt Hancock warned today that Britain will be battling coronavirus for ‘months to come’ with the number of cases doubling every five days. It comes as 11 British nationals flew into RAF Brize Norton on Sunday to join another 83 already quarantined on the Wirral. However, one passenger was isolated and rushed to hospital in Oxford after falling ill on the plane.  Mr Hancock told the Commons today: ‘Health ministers from G7 countries spoke and we agreed to co-ordinate our evidence and response wherever possible.

BBC

Times
Households will have to pay £3 a year more for a television licence from April, it was announced yesterday, as an analysis showed that replacing the compulsory fee with a voluntary subscription would cost the BBC £1.6 billion a year. Campaigners for the elderly said the price rise — from £154.50 to £157.50 a year — represented “yet another blow” to the 3.7 million over-75s who will soon be stripped of their free licences. The licence fee is pegged to inflation until 2022 under the terms of the BBC’s royal charter.

Inheritance tax

Mail
The inheritance tax system should be overhauled and the rate slashed to make it fairer and stop the super-rich using loopholes to avoid paying altogether, the head of an influential think tank has suggested. Paul Johnson, director of the Institute for Fiscal Studies, said that many of the nation’s wealthiest were finding ways to get out of paying the current 40 per cent rate. He backed a report from a group of MPs last week that recommended an overhaul, arguing it was now an unfair tax because it fell on the less well-off more heavily and also created an ‘administrative burden’.

Education

Times
Universities have offered students thousands of pounds to take a gap year because too many have accepted places. Elite Russell Group universities including Nottingham and Exeter have made the offers after taking on more students than places available. Last year the University of Nottingham offered 260 medical course applicants £2,000 to defer their studies for a year, while 59 graduate entry nursing applicants were offered £1,000. Five of the medical applicants accepted although none of those planning to study nursing agreed, Freedom of Information requests by The Times have shown.

Clean motoring

Times
A ban on selling new petrol and diesel cars will be brought forward by five years to improve air quality, the prime minister will announce today. Boris Johnson will say that the sale of new combustion engine cars and vans will end in 2035 rather than 2040. Restrictions could be introduced even sooner if a “faster transition is feasible”, the government indicated. New hybrids with an engine and battery will also be banned subject to consultation.

Mail
A ban on diesel and petrol cars could be moved forward five years to 2035 under Boris Johnson‘s bold new plans to tackle  climate change. Mr Johnson is preparing to set out Britain’s stall as a leading green country when the UK hosts the COP26 UN climate summit in November. Theresa May‘s government enshrined net zero carbon emissions by 2050 in law and Mr Johnson will be urging other nations to follow Britain’s lead. To reach that goal the government is now considering moving forward a ban on the sale of new petrol and diesel cars from 2040 to 2035 – and earlier if feasible.

Independent
Boris Johnson is pledging an earlier ban on new petrol and diesel cars, as he hits back at claims that his attempts to lead the world in tackling climate change are mired in “chaos”. In a long-awaited first speech on the climate emergency, the prime minister will call on other nations to match the UK’s landmark legal commitment to achieve ‘net zero’ carbon emissions by 2050. “There can be no greater responsibility than protecting our planet, and no mission that a Global Britain is prouder to serve,” he will tell a London reception attended by David Attenborough.

Energy

Sun
GAS boilers will have to be ditched from homes or upgraded by 2050 to meet government plans to cut the amount of greenhouse gases being pumped into the atmosphere. That’s according to a new action plan from energy regulator Ofgem, which warns that households face a massive shake-up of how they use energy and cars over the next 30 years. It comes as parliament has promised to slash the UK’s emissions by 80 per cent compared to 1990 levels by 2050.

Telegraph
Energy firms which overstate the green credentials of their tariffs could be targeted by the regulator, it has emerged. In its plan to support the Government’s net-zero carbon target, industry regulator Ofgem said it could take action against firms which mislead consumers by “greenwashing” their deals. Telegraph Money reported in August last year that households paying for energy deals marketed as “100pc renewable” could get as little as 3.7pc of their energy from renewable sources.

Cancer

Telegraph
The UK is at the bottom of a list of countries ranked by survival rates of some of the deadliest cancers, a study has found. The UK came 25th, 26th and 27th out of 29 countries for its five-year survival rates of pancreatic, stomach and lung cancer respectively, UK research shows. Research carried out by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine shows the UK had a five-year survival rate half that of the highest performing country. For cancers diagnosed between 2010 and 2014, the UK had an average five-year survival rate of just 16 per cent compared to South Korea, which had a rate of 32.8 per cent.

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