Brexit

Times
Boris Johnson is preparing to trigger the end of European law’s supremacy in Britain as he cements his “do or die” pledge to leave the EU on October 31, The Times has been told. Within days Stephen Barclay, the Brexit secretary, is expected to sign an order that will repeal the European Communities Act 1972 after October 31. Senior Eurosceptics said the move would represent a “totemic” moment and put Mr Johnson’s pledge to leave with or without a deal “in black and white”. Theresa May had infuriated them by failing to make the order before the March 29 Brexit deadline and eventually agreed with the EU to delay Brexit until October 31.

Express
LABOUR could see 50 of its MPs vote with Tories for a potential Brexit deal to avoid a no deal exit, according to a high profile backbencher. Stephen Kinnock, the son of former party leader Neil Kinnock, said a large group of his colleagues would support any Brexit deal secured by Prime Minister Boris Johnson. Mr Kinnock, whose mother was an MEP, said such an intervention may not occur if an attempt to block no deal in Parliament fails. As The Sun reported, a number of Labour MPs have admitted they should have voted for Theresa May’s withdrawal agreement when it was defeated for a third time.

Government of National Unity

Telegraph
Four Tory former ministers on Thursday “welcomed” Jeremy Corbyn’s plan to bring down the government and become a caretaker Prime Minister to stop a no deal Brexit. Former attorney general Dominic Grieve was branded “un-Conservative” by his own association chairman after he signed a letter with fellow remainer rebels Sir Oliver Letwin, Dame Caroline Spelman and Nick Boles offering to meet the Labour leader “to discuss the different ways” to stop the UK leaving the EU without a deal on October 31. On Thursday night, Jo Swinson offered to meet Mr Corbyn after initially denouncing his plan to build a ‘strictly time-limited’ cross-party coalition to force Boris Johnson from office as “nonsense”.

Sun
TORY rebels have sparked a fresh civil war in their own party today as they vowed to work with Jeremy Corbyn – after he declared his plans to storm into No10 to stop a No Deal Brexit. MPs were outraged after Remainer MPs including Dominic Grieve, Oliver Letwin and Caroline Spelman – along with independent Nick Boles, wrote to him this morning to open up talks on how to prevent us leaving without a deal. The letter said they had a “common priority” to work together to “prevent No Deal Brexit” and they welcomed his invite.

Times
Hardline Tory remainer MPs suggested they could favour a Jeremy Corbyn premiership over a no-deal Brexit, boosting the Labour leader’s plan to lead a caretaker government. Mr Corbyn wrote to other opposition parties and a group of Conservatives this week to say they must install him in No 10 to stop Britain crashing out of the European Union on October 31. Despite scepticism from the Liberal Democrats and hostility from some independents, the Tory MPs addressed by Mr Corbyn said they welcomed his approach and agreed to meet him.

Mail
Three top Tory Remainers are facing calls to be booted out of the party today after they agreed to meet Jeremy Corbyn to discuss how to block a No Deal divorce from the EU.  The Labour leader sent a letter to opposition leaders and a handful of senior Europhile Conservative MPs last night urging them to help him topple Boris Johnson and become caretaker PM to delay Brexit beyond October 31. The proposal has been given short shrift by Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson who called the plan ‘nonsense’ but a trio of pro-EU Tories have agreed to face-to-face talks with Mr Corbyn.  Dominic Grieve, Dame Caroline Spelman and Sir Oliver Letwin reportedly said in a written response to Mr Corbyn: ‘We agree that our common priority should be to work together in Parliament to prevent No Deal Brexit and welcome your invitation to discuss the different ways that this might be achieved.

Mirror
Jeremy Corbyn has outlined plans to install himself as a caretaker PM after defeating Mr Johnson in a confidence vote when MPs return from their summer break. In a letter to fellow Opposition party leaders – and some senior Tory backbenchers committed to thwarting no-deal – he vowed to enter No10 for a “strictly time-limited” period, delay Brexit and trigger a General Election. He also said he would campaign for a second EU referendum with the option of Remaining in the EU. The Labour leader wrote: “Following a successful vote of no confidence in the Government, I would then, as Leader of the Opposition, seek the confidence of the House for a strictly time-limited temporary government with the aim of calling a General Election, and securing the necessary extension of Article 50 to do so.

Evening Standard
Remain-supporting Tories have hinted that they could favour installing Jeremy Corbyn as an interim prime minister over a no-deal Brexit. The Labour leader reached out across the political divide to gain support for his plan to lead a caretaker government. His proposal was given a boost as the Conservatives he wrote to agreed to talks on how to stop the UK crashing out of the EU. They stopped short of giving Mr Corbyn’s offer their full backing, but Guto Bebb, who quit as defence minister last year to back a second referendum, said he was open to the idea of an emergency government run by the opposition leader.

Independent
A Conservative MP has broken ranks to support making Jeremy Corbyn a caretaker prime minister to avert the “generational damage” from a no-deal Brexit. Guto Bebb  criticised other parties and MPs who have rejected the Labour leader’s offer, after the Liberal Democrats branded it “nonsense”. “Those who have said they will do anything necessary to stop the long-term damage of a no-deal exit must take seriously this type of offer,” Mr Bebb said. “I certainly take the view that a short-term Jeremy Corbyn government is less damaging than the generational damage that would be caused by a no-deal Brexit.”

Guardian
The Liberal Democrats are under growing pressure to back Jeremy Corbyn as a caretaker prime minister to stop a no-deal Brexit after leading opposition figures and even one former Conservative minister said they were open to the idea. With anti-no-deal groups rapidly calibrating their positions in the aftermath of Corbyn’s intervention, a split has opened up among MPs hoping to block Boris Johnson’s Brexit strategy. But while the SNP, Plaid Cymru and the Greens said they would engage with Corbyn’s offer, the Lib Dem leader, Jo Swinson, laid out a rival plan for a national unity government led by the Tory veteran Ken Clarke or Labour’s Harriet Harman.

Sky News
Jeremy Corbyn has been told there is no time to “muck about with people’s egos” after his plan to become a temporary prime minister in order to avoid a no-deal Brexit was rejected. The Labour leader has written to the leaders of other political parties and senior backbenchers from across parliament to set out his proposals to stop the UK leaving the EU without a withdrawal agreement in 77 days’ time.

Independent
The Liberal Democrats have proposed either Ken Clarke or Harriet Harman as a caretaker prime minister to block a no-deal Brexit, having rejected Jeremy Corbyn’s claim as “nonsense”. Jo Swinson, the party’s new leader, said the stopgap premier must be someone who has “the confidence” of MPs across the Commons, including rebel Tories, if an “emergency government” was to succeed. And she said the person should be identified before Labour tables a vote of no confidence to try to topple Boris Johnson – a move now expected at the start of September. Ms Swinson set out her terms as some Conservative MPs fight a no-deal said they were “happy to meet” Mr Corbyn to discuss his overnight proposals.

Express
JEREMY CORBYN has come under a huge attack for his plans to become the next Prime Minister and has been accused of being too old to appeal to young voters who see Brexit as a threat to their future. The Labour Party leader has accelerated plans to oust Boris Johnson and take power at 10 Downing Street which could see him being installed as a caretaker Prime Minister. Jeremy Corbyn wants to call a no confidence vote in the Government, which would require majority support from the House of Commons, at the “earliest opportunity when we can be confident of success”.

iNews
Nicola Sturgeon said she would be prepared to help install Jeremy Corbyn as the leader of an emergency government to avert the “catastrophe” of a no-deal Brexit. Labour leader Mr Corbyn has urged other opposition parties to oust Boris Johnson in a vote of no confidence and make him a caretaker Prime Minister until a general election is held. His surprise plan was rejected out of hand by the Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson, who argued that he was the wrong person to unite a deeply divided Commons. But some pro-Remain Conservatives said they would meet Mr Corbyn to discuss tactics.

Scotland

Mail
Labour was last night accused of selling out the Union to get into No10 as Jeremy Corbyn crawled to the SNP over another independence referendum. Mr Corbyn said it was not up to the UK Parliament to block a second vote. It opens the door for him to offer the SNP another referendum after the 2014 poll in return for propping up a Labour government, even though he is ‘not in support’ of Scottish independence. SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon said Mr Corbyn had taken the ‘right’ position, tweeting: ‘It is legitimate to oppose independence and to argue against a referendum – it’s not legitimate for Westminster to block a democratic mandate and a majority vote.’

Express
IAN BLACKFORD is facing a severe backlash after the SNP Westminster leader endorsed a plot by Jeremy Corbyn to thwart Brexit and oust Boris Johnson. The staunch Remainer has been accused of double standards on democracy by frustrated Britons, following more relentless calls for the people of Scotland to have their say on independence, but continues to ignore the 17.4 million people who voted to leave the bloc in the 2016 EU referendum.

Reuters
The leader of the Scottish National Party, Nicola Sturgeon, said on Thursday her party and its 35 lawmakers would explore any option to stop Brexit in parliament and did not rule out backing opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn. “We will work with anyone and we’ll explore any option to stop Brexit,” Sturgeon told the BBC. She added that Corbyn, who earlier urged rivals to back him in a bid to topple Prime Minister Boris Johnson, had to set out a clear position on Brexit.

Guardian
Jeremy Corbyn has confirmed he believes Westminster should not block a second referendum on Scottish independence, but said he opposed the breakup of the UK. Corbyn implicitly endorsed remarks by his close ally John McDonnell last week where he said a Labour government would not obstruct a fresh independence vote if there was sufficient support for one in the Scottish parliament. Holyrood cannot hold a referendum without being given the powers to do so by the UK parliament.

EU

Sun
ANGELA Merkel is set to reject Boris Johnson’s bid to renegotiate the Brexit deal when the pair meet in France next weekend, leaked documents show. The German Chancellor will “stick to the line” that the backstop and Withdrawal Agreement can’t be changed according to a Finance Ministry paper. The dossier says her government now considers No Deal to be a “highly likely” outcome given the PM’s demands to ditch the Irish border fix. Sajid Javid will fly to Berlin today for his first face-to-face talks on Brexit with counterpart Olaf Scholz, according to German media.

Express
BRITISH banks are way behind schedule in moving key staff to the European Union ahead of Brexit, and could face significant setbacks if Britain leaves without a deal, the European Central Bank (ECB) said on Wednesday.   Dozens of London-based banks are expanding their European operations in order to continue doing business in the bloc after Brexit, under plans agreed with the ECB. The eurozone’s top banking watchdog, however, said they risked being caught off-guard in the event of a no deal divorce on October 31, the official Brexit deadline.

Hammond

Telegraph
Philip Hammond is facing a backlash from local party members over his attempts to block no-deal, with insiders indicating he could soon face a confidence vote. A “subset” of pro-Brexit members are becoming increasingly “vocal” in their opposition to his stance and recent interventions, according to multiple sources. Insiders in the former chancellor’s local Conservative association have told The Daily Telegraph that anger at Mr Hammond has grown in recent weeks, including among figures on the executive committee.

Westmonster
Former Chancellor Philip Hammond is said to be facing a backlash from local Conservatives in his constituency of Runnymede and Weybridge. It comes after he publicly blasted the increasingly popular option of a No Deal Brexit on WTO terms. Hammond has repeatedly criticised the prospect of exiting the EU without a deal, recently arguing that: “No Deal is a far cry from the highly optimistic vision presented by the Leave campaign – and there is no mandate for it.” A local Tory Councillor has hit back, telling The Telegraph that: “If I’d have been in the Prime Minister’s position, I would also say there has to be an exit day, irrespective.

NHS

Telegraph
The NHS is to scrap routine health MOTs for over 40s, amid promises to introduce online checks and more “targeted” advice. Ministers said the scrapping of a “one size fits all” system, introduced a decade ago, would use data and technology to pinpoint the right help to those in need of it. But patients’ groups raised fears that potentially deadly problems could go unchecked, with concern about the reliability of “predictive” tools used to estimate risk.  And they expressed concern that the move was an attempt to offer checks “on the cheap” by calling fewer people in to see GPs.

Sun
FIVE-yearly check-ups for the over 40s will be scrapped in radical NHS reforms. The health “MoTs” are believed to have helped prevent at least 2,500 deadly heart attacks or strokes but ministers say the once-size-fits-all approach no longer works. Instead millions of older patients could be offered online tests and given “targeted” advice, depending on their background. Personal data and technology would pinpoint those most at risk. Health Secretary Matt Hancock said: “Personalised, preventative healthcare is mission-critical to the healthcare service we want to build.”

Mail
The NHS has recruited 4,000 Asian nurses to replace EU staff who have quit since the 2016 Brexit referendum, figures show. The number of EU nurses plunged by around 3,000 – but that gap has been filled by the arrival of nurses from the Philippines and elsewhere in Asia.  Six per cent of all NHS staff and one in ten doctors were from the EU in March this year, according to the Office for National Statistics. It said 1.9million people were employed in healthcare occupations in 2018, with Britons making up 88 per cent of the workforce and non-Britons 12 per cent.  They were evenly divided between EU nationals and non-EU. It added: ‘The proportion of non-British nationals in the healthcare workforce has remained broadly stable since 2012.’

Education

Times
Universities were accused of luring students on to unsuitable courses after it emerged that some were offering cash incentives of up to £4,500 to recruit wavering school-leavers. About 300,000 teenagers received their A-level  results in England, Wales and Northern Ireland yesterday. The proportion who got the top grades of A* and A fell by almost one percentage point to 25.5 per cent, the lowest level since 2007. However, the number of prospective students has fallen by nearly 3 per cent this year while universities have expanded rapidly, leading to a battle among institutions for the £9,250 per year tuition fees each student brings.

Mail
Top universities were last night accused of dumbing down standards after they cut entry requirements by up to two grades to fill places through clearing yesterday. A number of prestigious Russell Group universities, including Birmingham, Warwick and Southampton, advertised courses in clearing with reduced A-level criteria. Ancient history at Birmingham, which charges fees of £9,250 a year, fell from ABB to BBC. It came as universities were accused of offering ‘bribes’ as high as £4,500 for students who accept last-minute places. They are luring them with lucrative ‘clearing scholarships’, laptops, fee discounts and even £200 cash rewards if they ‘refer a friend’.

Times
Head teachers have criticised the liberal use of unconditional offers after the universities minister said such offers were undermining faith in the education system. The heads said that A-level results had dipped among pupils given multiple unconditional offers, which are made during a student’s A-level studies and do not require them to achieve any grades to secure a university place. Lianne Riley-Gough, head of sixth form at Chalk Hill Academy in Luton, said that universities should rethink the notion of unconditional offers.

Armed forces

Times
The Ministry of Defence has been accused of betraying British troops with plans for “back door” legislation to curb injury compensation claims. Veterans and lawyers have warned that thousands of servicemen and women who have suffered life-changing physical and mental trauma could be blocked from seeking compensation under the plan. Claims must normally be brought within three years of the date of an injury, or the date on which the individual became aware of a cause of an injury, although courts can extend that period. The MoD wants to impose a “longstop” time period beyond which claims cannot be made. A ten-year limit is suggested although it could be shorter or longer.

Energy

Telegraph
The wind farm which contributed to a massive blackout was awarded nearly £100,000 in compensation after being ordered to reduce its output the day immediately after the power cut, the Telegraph can reveal. Nearly one million homes and businesses were left without electricity last Friday when Hornsea Wind Farm and Little Barford gas-fired station went off grid within minutes of each other. After getting back online, National Grid ordered Hornsea to reduce the electricity it supplied the network on Saturday night and Sunday morning entitling its owners, Orsted, to compensation.

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