No deal

Times
MPs will threaten next week to shut down the government if Boris Johnson defies parliament and tries to take Britain out of the European Union without a deal. In a cross-party move to thwart the frontrunner in the Tory leadership race, the Commons will vote on a plan to prohibit government spending in the event of a no-deal Brexit. The plan is being backed by Dominic Grieve, the former Tory attorney-general, and Dame Margaret Beckett, the former Labour foreign secretary. If successful, it would deny the government funds to pay for key elements of public spending including schools, welfare benefits and international aid.

Sun
REMAINER rebel MPs are to mount a dramatic new bid to block a No Deal Brexit next week by cutting off the Government’s money supply. The fresh attempt is being led by former Tory Attorney General Dominic Grieve and ex-Labour Foreign Secretary Dame Margaret Beckett. The cross-party duo have tabled amendments to routine finance legislation – dubbed estimates – that was set to be nodded through on Tuesday July 2. If the plan succeeds, the new PM will be forced to either pass a withdrawal agreement with the EU through the Commons or win its permission for a No Deal exit on October 31 first.

Sky News
Tory leadership frontrunner Boris Johnson has refused to rule out suspending parliament in order to force through Brexit. Mr Johnson said he was “not attracted” to the measure, saying he wanted to deliver Britain’s EU exit as a “proud representative democracy”. But he pointedly warned that it was essential MPs delivered on the 2016 referendum and finished the process after two delays. “I think our colleagues really are starting to come together,” he said at a digital hustings hosted by the party.

ITV News
Conservative leadership candidate Jeremy Hunt has said that unlike his rival, Boris Johnson, he would not force a general election, should Parliament take the option of no-deal off the table. The Foreign Secretary made the comments on ITV’s Peston show, clearly demarcating the differing standpoints of the two in the race for the Tory crown. Mr Johnson, who is seen as the front runner, has previously said he would call a general election should MPs pass a bill to take away the option of no-deal.

Independent
The Government has announced new plans to secure freight capacity to bring medicines and medical equipment from continental Europe in the case of a no-deal Brexit in October. The move follows the fiasco of transport secretary Chris Grayling’s decision to hire ferries to provide emergency cover in case the UK crashed out of the EU earlier this year. Contracts worth more than £100 million were signed with three companies to ship vital goods over the Channel, but one had to be ditched after it emerged it had no ships.

Guardian
Boris Johnson has said the chances of a no-deal Brexit are a “million-to-one against”, despite promising to leave on 31 October whether or not he has managed to strike a new agreement with the European Union. Johnson, the frontrunner to be prime minister, told a hustings that the chances of a no-deal Brexit were vanishingly small, as he believed there was a mood in the EU and among MPs to pass a new Brexit deal. “It is absolutely vital that we prepare for a no-deal Brexit if we are going to get a deal,” he said.

Sun
BORIS Johnson insisted the chances of leaving with a No Deal Brexit are a “million to one” as he promised an Australian-style immigration system if he gets to No10. The Tory frontrunner was cheered and whooped by Tories last night as he vowed to leave the EU by October 31st no matter what – as he answered questions from members and voters on Facebook and Twitter. Boris told activists in central London that “politics has changed since March 29” and he was confident that MPs would vote to deliver what the British people voted for three years ago.

Huffington Post
Boris Johnson has said the prospect of a general election to break the Brexit deadlock is “crazy” as he suggested his plan to leave the EU will win support from MPs as the issue poses an “existential threat” to both Labour and the Tories. Asked at the party’s digital hustings about an election or suspending parliament in order to prevent it blocking Brexit, the Tory leadership frontrunner said: “It would be absolutely crazy for any of us to think of going to the country and calling a general election before we get Brexit done.”

Tory leadership

Express
BORIS JOHNSON has vowed to introduce an Australian-style points-based system for migrants if he becomes Prime Minister. The former Foreign Secretary’s plans to restore “public faith” with the new immigration system, The Daily Telegraph reported. Mr Johnson’s system will mean any foreigners who want to work in Britain have to be able to speak English and have a job before they arrive. He added foreign workers will not be allowed to “cut ahead in the queue”. Mr Johnson told The Daily Telegraph: “We will restore democratic control of immigration policy after we leave the EU.

Telegraph
Boris Johnson has pledged to introduce an Australian-style points-based system for migrants to restore “public faith” in immigration control. Foreigners who want to work in Britain will have to be able to speak English and must have a job before they arrive if Mr Johnson becomes prime minister. The Tory leadership front-runner said foreign workers will not be allowed to “cut ahead in the queue” by taking jobs that British people can do, and will have no entitlement to benefits when they first arrive.

Times
Boris Johnson will pledge today to restore public faith in Britain’s immigration rules with a regime modelled on Australia’s points-based system. The Tory leadership frontrunner says Britain must be more open to skilled migrants but he will give assurances that “we have control over the number of unskilled immigrants coming into the country” after Brexit. “We must be tougher on those who abuse our hospitality,” he will say.

Guardian
Boris Johnson has vowed he will push for introducing an immigration system modelled on a so-called Australian-style points system, resurrecting one of the key promises of the Vote Leave campaign. In a pledge that could pave the way to abandoning the Conservatives’ net migration target, Johnson said the country needed to be more open to highly skilled immigrants and tougher on those who “abused” the UK’s “hospitality”. Johnson’s camp stressed this proposal was not intended to suggest he would abandon the current proposed immigration bill, but would instead give new instructions to the migration advisory committee (MAC) to investigate the idea of a points-based system.

Independent
Boris Johnson has pledged to clamp down on immigration  after Brexit by introducing a points-based system if he becomes prime minister.  The Tory leadership frontrunner said he would bring in an Australian-style system that would judge prospective immigrants on the contribution they could make to the UK.  As the leadership candidates traded promises, his rival, Jeremy Hunt, vowed to scrap the tuition-fee debt of young people who start businesses.

Mail
Boris Johnson last night pledged to introduce an Australian-style immigration system, despite warnings it will do nothing to cut the number of migrants coming to the UK. In a significant policy announcement designed to get his campaign back on track, Mr Johnson revived his pledge from the EU referendum  campaign to introduce a ‘tough’ points-based system modelled on the arrangement used Down Under. It came as Mr Johnson was criticised by a leading Brexiteer over his claim there would be no trade tariffs on UK exports in the event of a No Deal Brexit.

Sky News
The spotlight has fallen on the domestic policies of the two Tory leadership hopefuls. Boris Johnson has laid out his immigration plans, while an influential think-tank has analysed Jeremy Hunt’s spending pledges. Mr Johnson believes “the public wants an Australian-style points based immigration system”, adding he will be the one to deliver it. The system, which Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage has consistently promoted as an immigration policy, would mean that people wanting to come to the UK to work, must hit a number of criteria beforehand.

BBC News
Tory leadership rivals Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt have unveiled pledges on immigration and education. Frontrunner Mr Johnson has promised to deliver an Australian-style points-based immigration system if he becomes prime minister. And Foreign Secretary Mr Hunt said he would cancel the tuition fee debts of young entrepreneurs who start businesses and employ people. The winner of the contest will take over from Theresa May on 24 July.

Telegraph
Jeremy Hunt has promised to wipe tuition fee debt for young entrepreneurs who launch their own business after leaving university.  As part of his pledge to “turbocharge” the British economy after Brexit, the Tory leadership hopeful said he will waive loan repayments for any graduate who launches a start-up employing more than 10 people for five years.  The Foreign Secretary, who made his fortune as an entrepreneur before entering into the world of politics, hopes the proposal will incentivise more young people to follow in his footsteps.

Times
Jeremy Hunt’s allies accused him of opening the door to attacks by Boris Johnson after he mistakenly referred to the October 31 Brexit date as a “fake deadline” and was alleged to have suggested that Leave voters were little Englanders. Asked by a councillor on Twitter how he would unite the country after Brexit, Mr Hunt replied: “Deliver a Brexit that works for the 48 per cent not just the 52 per cent — a positive, open and internationalist Brexit, Great Britain not Little England.”

Independent
Jeremy Hunt’s plan to hike spending and cut taxes if he becomes prime minister would “exacerbate” the UK’s financial problems, a highly respected think tank has said. The Tory leadership candidate has already announced pledges that would cost up to £40bn, according to the Institute for Fiscal Studies. Mr Hunt, who is vying with Boris Johnson in the battle to succeed Theresa May, has laid out plans to cut corporation tax, ramp up defence spending, raise the threshold above which workers must pay national  insurance, and cut the interest rate on student debt.

Express
TORY leadership hopeful Jeremy Hunt weighed into the Peterborough fraud row during today’s hustings as he said the UK “needs to combat electoral fraud” as he outlined how he would revolutionise the voting system. Foreign Secretary Mr Hunt took part in the first-ever online hustings in the history of the Conservative Party, answering questions members of the public published on social media. One urged him to explain what he would do as a Prime Minister to tackle electoral fraud. Journalist Hannah Vaughan Jones, who led the hustings, read the question: “Do you propose any reform to tackle electoral fraud, for example the abuse of the postal voting system?”

Ireland

Express
THE LEADER of the DUP, Arlene Foster, has said it is “very important” the UK leaves the EU on October 31 – but refused to back either Boris Johnson or Jeremy Hunt to become the next Prime Minister. Mrs Foster said the Government must keep a no deal Brexit on the table and said repeated extensions of the Article 50 timeframe had fuelled public discontent. Her comments come after Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt both outlined their vision of Brexit. Mr Johnson has promised the UK will leave by October 31, while Mr Hunt has left the possibility of an extension open.

BBC News
DUP leader Arlene Foster has said it is “very important” for the UK to leave the EU by 31 October. She said there was an opportunity for the new prime minister to “proactively” deal with the backstop. Mrs Foster said the fact Brexit had not happened yet had caused “discontent within the UK “. Britain was meant to leave the EU on March 31 but the date was pushed back after parliament failed to back a withdrawal deal. Speaking at a Policy Exchange event in London on Tuesday, Mrs Foster said she believed Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt would both be able to reach a Brexit agreement if they became prime minister.

Westmonster
Republic of Ireland Taoiseach, Leo Varadkar has warned the Irish economy could potentially face a recession in the event of a no-deal Brexit.  Speaking at the National Economic Dialogue in Dublin Castle today, Varadkar said: “In a no-deal hard Brexit – in which case we won’t have to worry about the economy over-heating – it will slow down rapidly, even contract.” He added that the government would publish updated no-deal contingency plans next month.

Express
BBC News’ Europe Editor Katya Adler revealed Ireland are under pressure from the European Union to come to a solution to the Irish border issue, which has remained to be a key sticking point in negotiations. The Irish backstop emerged as one of the most contentious aspects of the Brexit negotiations as Leavers voiced concerns the controversial clause could be exploited to keep the UK closely aligned to the European Union. The British Government demanded Brussels agree to renegotiate the terms of the backstop but was repeatedly refused as the bloc cited fears the lack of an insurance policy could cause the return of a hard border on the island of Ireland.

EU

Independent
The European Commission has again reiterated that the Brexit withdrawal agreement will not be negotiated, “full stop” – despite claims by Boris Johnson that he would somehow be able to reopen talks. When asked whether the agreement could be reopened under any circumstances – including to stop a no deal or prevent a hard border in Ireland – a spokesperson for the commission was emphatic.  “I can confirm, as has been repeated several times, we will not be renegotiating the withdrawal agreement, full stop,” she told reporters in Brussels.

Social care

Independent
Thousands of old and disabled people are at risk of losing vital support because long-term funding for adult social care has been neglected by successive governments, care chiefs have warned. A lack of certainty about future budgets after April 2020 could see councils having to make “incredibly difficult decisions” over the future of services, the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services (Adass) said.

Health tourism

Times
The NHS must have better ways to distinguish between healthcare tourists and vulnerable people, MPs have said. Members of the health select committee renewed demands for an urgent review of how foreign patients are billed for NHS services after the British Medical Association voted to stop charging patients from overseas, callin the system racist. The MPs told ministers that the present rules, which came into force in 2017 under Jeremy Hunt as health secretary and oblige doctors to check patients’ entitlement to most forms of care, were “causing harm” to vulnerable people.

Crime

Mail
The top police officer in the country has admitted that the number of crimes being solved across the UK is ‘woeful’. Scotland Yard Commissioner Cressida Dick said ‘I’m not proud’ that fewer offenders are facing punishment amid rising crime. She spoke out about the ‘low’ number of criminals being prosecuted, adding that it did not reflect well on law enforcers. In an extraordinary indictment, Miss Dick said: ‘I am worried about the criminal justice system – the volume and complexity of crime is rising yet fewer people are appearing at court.

Cancer

Telegraph
Cervical cancer could be eliminated within decades, scientists say, as a Lancet study shows the effectiveness of jabs for teenagers. The research on 60 million people in wealthy countries, including the UK, shows a sharp reduction in levels of infections which can cause the disease, since vaccines were introduced.  All 12 and 13 year old girls have been offered the jabs at school, since 2008, with a catchup programme for older girls in the early years of the programme.  From September, it will be extended to boys.  The research, funded by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and led by Canadian researchers, examined progress in 14 countries, including the UK.

Mail
Cervical cancer could be eliminated in the UK within a few decades thanks to the school vaccination programme, scientists say. A major review published last night found vaccination had led to plummeting cervical cancer risk around the world. And experts said if uptake remains high, the disease would soon be eliminated in countries including the UK. All schoolgirls in Britain have been offered the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine at the age of 12 or 13 since 2008 and later this year the programme will be extended to boys at the same age.

Times
Cervical cancer could be eliminated in Britain within decades because the HPV vaccine has been so successful, scientists said yesterday. Rates of infection by the cancer-causing viruses have fallen by 86 per cent among young women aged 15 to 19 since they started being vaccinated in schools in 2008, researchers found. The HPV vaccine prevents infection from human papillomavirus, a common group of viruses that are behind 90 per cent of cases of cervical cancer.

Air travel

Mail
Fresh details of inflation-busting pay demands by BA pilots emerged last night as they began voting on whether to strike this summer. Pilots on six-figure deals have threatened to inflict misery on passengers by launching protests at the height of the holiday season.

Times
The threat to passenger aircraft from drones has been grossly underestimated, MPs have been told. Pilots’ leaders said that the number of near-misses between drones and aircraft was likely to be significantly higher than official figure of almost three a week. Tim Pottage from the British Airline Pilots’ Association (Balpa) said that pilots spent most of their time monitoring instruments or looking straight ahead and may miss many close passes at the sides of their aircraft.

Heatwave

Telegraph
The heatwave sweeping through Europe and likened to “hell” has claimed its first lives as temperatures surpassed 40 degrees Celsius on several parts of the continent. Three swimmers at beaches in France are through to have died of “hydrocution” – suffering a cardiac arrest when coming into contact with water due to the temperature difference, according to local reports. A man aged 70 died after jumping into cool water at Marseillant beach, southern France, According to Midi Libre, he was helped out and remained “very calm” but emergency service then failed to resuscitate him when he lost consciousness.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email