Brexit

Telegraph
The Queen could be asked to block backbench legislation which could frustrate Theresa May’s Brexit plans.   A senior Government minister confirmed that one option was for the Queen to be asked not to give royal assent to any backbench legislation drawn up by Tory MPs Dominic Grieve or Nick Boles which is given debating time. Any veto would be the first time a Monarch has blocked Parliamentary legislation since Queen Anne vetoed the Scottish Militia Act in 1707 and would set the Queen against John Bercow, the Speaker, who has enabled Mr Grieve’s attempts to seize control of the Brexit process to go ahead.

Telegraph
There are now five competing Brexit plans which MPs will have to choose from in the coming weeks: The Prime Minister’s, Labour’s, Yvette Cooper’s, Dominic Grieve’s and the one backed by no-deal Brexiteers.  Below is a breakdown of each: What it is, who supports it and if it could work.

BBC News
MPs are putting forward plans to change the outcome of Brexit ahead of a vote next week on the PM’s amended deal. Theresa May said on Monday she was focused on altering the backstop – the “insurance policy” designed to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland. But Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said the prime minister was in denial about the level of opposition to her deal.

Times
Up to 40 members of the government will resign next week if Conservative MPs are banned from voting for a plan to stop a no-deal Brexit, No 10 has been told. Amber Rudd, the work and pensions secretary, has demanded that all Tory MPs are allowed a free vote on plans that would clear the path for extending Article 50 — the mechanism by which Britain leaves the European Union.

Mail
Theresa May today refused to rule out a no deal Brexit and blasted calls for a second referendum – as she unveiled her Brexit Plan B.  She vowed to go back to Brussels to try to win new concessions on the hated Irish backstop as she scrambles to win back the support of the DUP and Tory benches. And although this is the same strategy she tried to win support for her deal first time round, she hopes the added time pressure before Britain leaves the EU on March 29 will bring fresh concessions.

Independent
Theresa May faced protests from MPs of all parties and from business leaders after unveiling a “plan B” Brexit plan virtually identical to the one that crashed to a record defeat last week. The prime minister was accused of refusing to accept the reality of the crushing rejection of her plan, after vowing to again seek changes to the Irish border backstop – despite the EU repeatedly insisting it will not budge. Business leaders also warned the statement was “another bleak day”.

Mirror
Brexit is a smouldering wreck after Theresa May’s deal suffered the worst defeat in House of Commons history. But out of the ashes, a string of radically different Plan B options are taking shape – and will wrestle for control in the Commons. The Prime Minister’s own Plan B will go head to head with plans from Remain-backing MPs that could delay Brexit or stop it altogether. Labour wants to leave with a customs union, while other Remainers want to force a second EU referendum.

Yahoo News
Theresa May’s Plan B was bluntly ruled out by European leaders today just hours before she stood up to announce it to MPs. Dublin delivered a firm “No” to Downing Street’s latest bid to go back to Brussels and ask for concessions on the backstop. And the vice-president of the European Parliament also flatly rejected two other ideas being hastily floated as ways of defusing the Brexit deal: one being to remove the backstop from the EU agreement and replace it with an Anglo-Irish treaty; the other being to rewrite the Good Friday agreement that underpins the peace process.

Sun
THERESA May for the first time raised the threat of street violence yesterday if Brexit is reversed. The PM also pleaded with Parliament to give her a mandate to go back to Brussels and toughen up her Brexit deal after signalling she had no Plan B. Meanwhile pro-EU Work and Pensions Secretary Amber Rudd warned up to 40 ministers will resign unless they are allowed to join a cross-party bid to halt a No Deal scenario. Mrs May told MPs of her “deep concerns” about trying to halt Brexit with a second referendum.

Express
THERESA MAY is readying for a Commons clash today when she sets out her backup Brexit plan in a bid to build a majority to vote for the deal. After the crushing defeat of her deal last week, the Prime Minister is unwilling to budge on her key demands and will be explaining how she intends to proceed in both oral and written statements to the House of Commons. She will also table a “neutral” motion to be debated and voted on – along with any amendments tabled by MPs – on Tuesday, January 29.

Second referendum

Telegraph
Jeremy Corbyn has endorsed a plan to force a second EU referendum as he bowed to pressure from Labour party members and MPs. Mr Corbyn wants the Government to give MPs the final say next week on a second referendum. If a majority back a referendum, Parliament could force Theresa May to hold a new in/out public vote that could lead to Brexit  being reversed. Supporters of the so-called “People’s Vote” were jubilant tonight, describing Labour’s new policy as a “momentous” move that brought a referendum a “massive” step closer.

ITV News
Fresh Commons clashes over launching a second Brexit referendum and blocking a no-deal EU withdrawal loom as Theresa May faces new challenges to her authority. Labour wants Parliament to be given the option to back a national poll on Brexit when MPs vote on the Government’s EU exit stance next week. An amendment to the Prime Minister’s Brexit motion calls for a vote on backing Labour’s plan for a customs union with the EU, and whether to legislate “to hold a public vote on a deal or a proposition” supported by a Commons majority.

Mail
Theresa May warned yesterday that a second Brexit referendum could damage social cohesion and undermine public trust in British democracy. The Prime Minister spoke out as Jeremy Corbyn opened the door to a second poll last night. In significant shift, the Labour leader tabled a Commons amendment that would require the Government to provide time for Parliament to legislate for ‘a public vote’ on the final Brexit deal. If successful this could result in a second referendum later this year.

Express
THERESA May has warned a second EU referendum could trigger widespread civil disorder and unrest across Britain by destroying trust in Parliament – as well as the “break-up of our United Kingdom”. In her most ominous forecast yet about the dangers of stalling Brexit, the Prime Minister said a rerun of the 2016 national poll “could damage social cohesion by undermining faith in our democracy”. Such a vote would strengthen “the hand of those campaigning to break up our United Kingdom”, she feared – a nod to the growing confidence of the Irish reunification and Scottish independence campaigns.

Guardian
Labour has said the Commons should be able to vote on whether to hold a second referendum in an amendment the party submitted on Monday night to Theresa May’s Brexit update. It is the first time the party has asked MPs to formally consider a second poll, although the carefully worded compromise amendment did not commit the party’s leadership to backing a referendum if such a vote were to take place. The wording called for May’s government to hold a vote on two options – its alternative Brexit plan and whether to legislate “to hold a public vote on a deal or a proposition” that is supported by a majority in the Commons.

Sun
JEREMY Corbyn has given his backing to Labour MPs’ plan for a second Brexit referendum. The Labour leader – who has long opposed UK membership of the EU – now wants the Government to give MPs the final say on whether there should be a second vote. If a majority back a referendum, Parliament in turn could force Theresa May to hold a new vote that could lead to Brexit being reversed, reports the Telegraph.

WTO rules

Westmonster
Whilst MPs in Westminster disgracefully try to hold up Brexit and Project Fear is whipped up around a No Deal Brexit, it is increasingly clear that the British public want out on 29th March on WTO terms. The Guardian  (bless them) have found themselves disturbed by an ICM poll they’ve seen that shows a WTO Brexit is now the most popular way forward. The 2,000-strong poll, carried out after Theresa May’s deal was rejected in Parliament, showed a No Deal exit to have the most support of any single option.

Breitbart
Peter Lilley has hit back at Project Fear stories that Britain will be worse off if it leaves the EU without a deal, saying the country will spend less on EU tariffs and goods would not be held up at ports. Lord Lilley, who helped establish the World Trade Organization (WTO), hit back at claims by industry minister Richard Harrington MP that WTO terms are “a last resort position” and not meant for trading with complex economies. “It is meant to provide the basic safe framework for countries where you can’t face retaliation.

Art50

Order-order
A new ICM Poll alarmed the Guardian last night, with No Deal being the public’s leading option as to what should happen next. It’s also the legal default as long as Parliamentary deadlock continues… No Deal: 28%; Referendum: 24%; General Election: 11%; Withdrawal Agreement: 8%. Whilst a cleaner Brexit is comfortably popular among the public, according to  Election Maps UK, just 116 MPs support it.

Mirror
Theresa May has not ruled out delaying the day that the UK leaves the EU beyond March 29. With the clock ticking a number of MPs have suggested an extension to try and find a solution parliament can agree on. She was forced to come and update the Commons on her plan B after suffering the worst ever defeat for a sitting Prime Minister on her Brexit  deal. Despite talks with opposition MPs – excluding the Labour  leader Jeremy Corbyn – Mrs May has so far failed to build a consensus. But despite talking down the benefits of an extension, she refused to rule it out.

Express
THERESA May could face a wave of ministerial resignations unless Tory MPs are allowed to vote on a plan to block a no-deal Brexit by extending Article 50, Amber Rudd has warned. The work and pensions secretary is reportedly urging the Prime Minister to grant a free vote on an amendment tabled by Labour’s Yvette Cooper or risk up to 40 members of the Government quitting in protest. Ms Rudd, a close ally of Mrs May, is trying to convince Number 10 on behalf of dozens of Tory MPs who want to vote for the delay, The Times reports.

Irish backstop

Telegraph
Theresa May’s chief Brexit negotiator privately cast doubt on her ability to renegotiate the Irish backstop as part of her Brexit “plan B”, The Telegraph has been told. A source said Mr Robbins texted Philip Hammond, the Chancellor, during a Cabinet conference call raising concerns about the prospect of re-opening the EU withdrawal agreement. The Telegraph has been told that Mr Robbins, who was listening in on the call, sent the message to Mr Hammond as Mrs May was outlining plans to secure changes in a bid to win over Tory Eurosceptics and the DUP.

Cross-Channel

Times
Up to 10,000 cross-Channel ferry passengers face disruption as part of contingency planning for a no-deal Brexit, it was revealed yesterday. Brittany Ferries has warned passengers that timetables have been amended in the weeks after Britain leaves the EU to create additional space to transport “critical goods” across the Channel. Passengers with bookings in the six weeks after Brexit — including over the Easter school holidays — have been told that they have been rebooked on to ferries with a different departure time.

Times
Trade between Dover and Calais could drop by as much as 87 per cent if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal, a government analysis has concluded. Severe disruption to freight traffic of between 75 per cent and 87 per cent could last for six months and could remain at 50 per cent of the present levels for much longer, according to a contingency report by the Border Force.

Mail
Freight trade across the English Channel could plunge by between 75 and 87 per cent if Britain leaves the EU without a deal, the Border Force has warned.

And a business minister said No Deal would be ‘an absolute disaster’, adding that he feared both Jaguar and Mini could close their factories. An internal Border Force report on no-deal contingency plans found the slump in trade could last six months, Sky News reported.

EU

Express
THE EU wants Britain to be its “subjects” after Brexit, a leading Eurosceptic has claimed. Tory MEP Daniel Hannan believes Brussels has shown “denial, fury and contempt” towards Britain’s decision to leave the bloc. He is adamant the Commons should now vote to approve just 410 pages of Theresa May’s Withdrawal Agreement. But it should refuse to back 175 pages of the Prime Minister’s Brexit deal over the Northern Ireland backstop, Mr Hannan said.

Westmonster
In yet another embarrassing drubbing for the establishment’s increasingly bonkers Project Fear, the Portuguese government have revealed plans for British tourists to get ‘fast track’, UK-only lanes post-Brexit. British tourists are a huge financial asset, this is the type of common sense solution we’ll see plenty more of once the UK has left the European Union. Prime Minister Antonio Costa has announced the lanes will be running at Faro Airport in the Algarve and Funchal Airport on Madeira.

Independent
Germany’s government has floated the prospect of Britain remaining in the EU, suggesting the country might want to “think about it again” with a second referendum. The country’s Europe minister Michael Roth described Brexit as a “tragedy” worthy of Shakespeare, suggesting that it would have “pushed the limits” of the great playwright’s imagination. “The door to the EU always remains open – perhaps think about it again,” Mr Roth told German broadcaster ARD.

BBC News
The head of France’s main farmers’ union has warned that a no-deal Brexit could have a severe impact on French agricultural exports. Christiane Lambert of the FNSEA union said French wine and spirits producers would be hit hardest, as their sector had a €1.3bn (£1.1bn; $1.5bn) annual surplus in trade with the UK. Dairy goods and fruit are also major French exports. A UK no-deal exit from the EU would bring new customs checks and rules.

Guardian
Michel Barnier has called on Theresa May to shift her focus from renegotiating the Irish backstop to one that embraced a closer relationship with the EU to secure cross-party support for the Brexit deal. While the prime minister stated her intention in parliament to plough on with seeking concessions on the withdrawal agreement, the EU’s chief negotiator suggested this was no longer a “key part of the debate” in the UK.

Mail
David Cameron never wanted to hold the EU referendum and hoped the Lib Dems would block it, Donald Tusk claimed today.  The EU council president has torn into the former PM for his ‘stupid’ policy in an interview for a new documentary. Mr Tusk said that Mr Cameron was relying on having coalition partners after the 2015 election who would stop the crucial vote going ahead. However, when the Tories unexpectedly emerged with a majority, he found himself having to renegotiate the membership package and go through it

Express
DAVID Cameron’s belief that a Brexit referendum would never be held sensationally backfired, a new documentary will reveal. As the former Conservative Prime Minister attempted to get immigration concessions from the EU before the 2015 general election, he was warned by still-serving European Council president Donald Tusk not to promise the Brexit referendum. Mr Tusk labelled the vote “dangerous” and “stupid” after Mr Cameron confided he expected to go into another coalition government with the Liberal Democrats who he knew would veto the referendum.

Independent
The president of the European Council has revealed that he told David Cameron to “get real” over plans for the referendum that would see Britain vote to leave the EU and plunge the UK into political chaos. In an interview for a new BBC documentary Donald Tusk said he told the then prime minister that there was “no appetite” among other countries for changes to the EU just because the UK was going to hold a “stupid referendum”.

Tax

Times
The taxman is to write and apologise for sending hundreds of taxpayers £100 penalty notices even though they had filed their self-assessment tax returns weeks before the deadline. Her Majesty’s Revenue & Customs (HMRC) admitted the mistake after The Times revealed on Saturday that taxpayers who had filed online were sent letters telling them they were late and would have to pay a fine. The deadline for online returns is January 31.

Social care

Times
Vulnerable people will be detained for years and care home managers who could profit will be involved in the decisions, charities and campaigners warn. Rushed government reforms designed to save money embed a “worrying conflict of interest” at the heart of rulings on depriving people with dementia, learning disabilities and mental illness of their liberty, it is feared. In a letter to The Times, 13 charities and rights groups say that hundreds of thousands of people risk “exploitation and abuse” by changes tripling the time they can be detained without review.

House prices

Times
House prices in some of Britain’s most exclusive postcodes have fallen by a quarter over the past year as higher taxes and uncertainty over the outcome of Brexit dampens demand. Almost £500,000 has been wiped from the average value of homes in Kensington and Chelsea and the City of Westminster in the year to November, according to Your Move. Other upmarket areas in the capital, such as Hammersmith & Fulham and Camden, have had falls of more than 10 per cent, the estate agency said.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email